News Center

Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray Spectroscopy

Berkeley Lab researchers have, for the first time, captured the ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a chemical reaction using ultrafast, tabletop X-ray spectroscopy. The researchers used femtosecond pulses of X-ray light to catch the unraveling of a ring molecule that is important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes.

New Measurements Suggest ‘Antineutrino Anomaly’ Fueled by Modeling Error

Results from a new study involving Berkeley Lab scientists could explain a mismatch between predictions and recent measurements of ghostly particles streaming from nuclear reactors—the so-called “reactor antineutrino anomaly” that has puzzled physicists since 2011.

The Economic Case for Wind and Solar Energy in Africa

To meet skyrocketing demand for electricity, African countries may have to triple their energy output by 2030. While hydropower and fossil fuel power plants are favored approaches in some quarters, a new assessment by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found that wind and solar can be economically and environmentally competitive options.

Cryo-Electron Microscopy Achieves Unprecedented Resolution Using New Computational Methods

Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—which enables the visualization of viruses, proteins, and other biological structures at the molecular level—is a critical tool used to advance biochemical knowledge. Now Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers have extended cryo-EM’s impact further by developing a new computational algorithm that was instrumental in constructing a 3-D atomic-scale model of bacteriophage

New Study Maps Space Dust in 3-D

A new Berkeley Lab-led study provides 3-D views of space dust in the Milky Way, which could help us understand the properties of this dust and how it affects views of distant objects.

Study: Soils Could Release Much More Carbon Than Expected as Climate Warms

Soils could release much more CO2 than expected into the atmosphere as the climate warms. The findings are based on a field experiment that explored what happens to organic carbon trapped in soil when all soil layers are warmed, which in this case extend to a depth of 100 centimeters.

Attention Earthlings: Help Wanted in Finding a New Planet

Data research for a Berkeley Lab-led dark energy experiment benefits citizen science project that seeks the public’s help in the hunt for a hypothesized Neptune-like Planet Nine.

New Materials Could Turn Water into the Fuel of the Future

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Caltech have—in just two years—nearly doubled the number of materials known to have potential for use in solar fuels. They did so by developing a process that promises to speed the discovery of commercially viable generation of solar fuels that could replace coal, oil, and other fossil fuels.

New Evidence for a Water-Rich History on Mars

Mars may have been a wetter place than previously thought, according to research on simulated Martian meteorites conducted, in part, at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source.

New Projects to Make Geothermal Energy More Economically Attractive

The California Energy Commission has awarded $2.7 million to Berkeley Lab for two geothermal projects. The projects, which will take place at The Geysers, could make geothermal energy more cost-effective to deploy and operate.