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New Studies of Ancient Concrete Could Teach Us to Do as the Romans Did

July 3rd, 2017

A new look inside 2,000-year-old concrete – made from volcanic ash, lime, and seawater – has provided new clues to the evolving chemistry and mineral cements that allow ancient harbor structures to withstand the test of time.

News Release

Researchers ID New Mechanism for Keeping DNA Protein in Line

June 29th, 2017

Electrostatic forces known as phosphate steering help guide the actions of an enzyme called FEN1 that is critical in DNA replication and repair, finds a new study led by Berkeley Lab researchers. The findings help explain how FEN1 distinguishes which strands of DNA to target, revealing key details about a vital process in healthy cells as well as providing new directions for cancer treatment research.

News Release

What’s On Your Skin? Archaea, That’s What

June 29th, 2017

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms – and they’re not just bacteria. A study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.

Feature Story

Dark Matter Day Is Approaching … but Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark

June 28th, 2017

A global hunt for the universe’s missing matter is underway, and this autumn everyone is invited to join in. On and around October 31, 2017, events around the world will celebrate the hunt for the universe’s unseen “dark matter.”

News Release

Could This Strategy Bring High-Speed Communications to the Deep Sea?

June 27th, 2017

Berkeley Lab researchers are proposing a new method for sending acoustic waves through water that could dramatically increase communication speeds for scuba divers, deep sea robots, and remote ocean monitors. By taking advantage of the dynamic rotation generated as waves travel, the researchers were able to pack more channels onto a single frequency, effectively increasing the amount of information capable of being transmitted.

News Release

New Class of ‘Soft’ Semiconductors Could Transform HD Displays

June 26th, 2017

New research by Berkeley Lab scientists could help usher in a new generation of high-definition displays, optoelectronic devices, photodetectors, and more. They have shown that a class of “soft” semiconductors can be used to emit multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers. The work could challenge quantum dot displays that rely upon traditional semiconductor nanocrystals to emit light.