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Dynamic New App for Learning About Particle Physics Now Available

A free app for Android and Apple devices called The Particle Adventure makes checking out the world of quarks, dark matter, and particle accelerators as easy as tapping touchscreen icons. The science of particle physics is illustrated via categories including “How Do We Know Any of This?” and “Unsolved Mysteries.” You can skim through the major categories or dig deep into topics such as the discovery of the Higgs boson.

Switching to Spintronics

Berkeley Lab researchers used an electric field to reverse the magnetization direction in a multiferroic spintronic device at room temperature, a demonstration that points a new way towards spintronics and smaller, faster and cheaper ways of storing and processing data.

World Record for Compact Particle Accelerator

Using one of the most powerful lasers in the world, Berkeley Lab researchers have accelerated subatomic particles to the highest energies ever recorded. They used an emerging class of compact particle accelerator that physicists believe can shrink traditional, miles-long accelerators to machines that can fit on a table.

A Path Toward More Powerful Tabletop Accelerators

Making a tabletop particle accelerator just got easier. A new study shows that certain requirements for the lasers used in an emerging type of small-area particle accelerator can be significantly relaxed. Researchers hope the finding could bring about a new era of accelerators that would need just a few meters to bring particles to great

Andrew Sessler Wins Fermi Award

President Obama has named Andrew Sessler, award-winning theoretical physicist, acclaimed humanitarian, and former director of Berkeley Lab, as a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award, the government’s oldest and most prestigious prizes for scientific achievement.
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Five Berkeley Lab Researchers are 2013 APS Fellows

This year’s recently announced American Physical Society (APS) Fellows includes five scientists from Berkeley Lab, two from the Materials Sciences Division and one each from the Accelerator and Fusion Research, Nuclear Science, and Engineering divisions. APS Fellows are elected by their peers for “exceptional contributions to the physics enterprise; e.g., outstanding physics research, important applications of physics, leadership in or service to physics, or significant contributions to physics education.”

Berkeley Lab’s Prominent Role in the Higgs Discovery

The Nobel Prize in Physics to François Englert and Peter Higgs cites confirmation of their work by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, in what Physics Division Director Natalie Roe calls “a powerful testament to human imagination, innovation, perseverance and international cooperation.” Berkeley Lab provides one of the largest U.S. contingents to ATLAS, led by Ian Hinchliffe. Berkeley Lab’s Physics, Accelerator, and Engineering Divisions have made and continue to make vital contributions to the LHC.

Successful Test of New U.S. Magnet Puts Large Hadron Collider on Track for Major Upgrade

Berkeley Lab scientists played a major role in the development of a powerful superconducting quadrupole magnet, made from high performance niobium tin, that will be central to a major upgrade planned for CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The magnet, dubbed HQ02a, was built and successfully tested through the U.S. LHC Accelerator Program (LARP).

APEX: Superior Beams at a Million Pulses per Second

APEX: Superior Beams at a Million Pulses per Second

Does Antimatter Fall Up or Down?

Theory and observations support the view that antimatter experiences gravity just as ordinary matter does, but the evidence so far has been indirect. Indeed, some theorists speculate that antimatter is antigravitational, that it may fall “up” instead of “down.” Led by Berkeley Lab physicists, the ALPHA Collaboration at CERN has made direct measurements of the gravitational mass of atoms of antihydrogen, testing how they fall and in what direction.