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Copper on the Brain at Rest

Chris Chang Feature imahe

A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.

Golden Approach to High-speed DNA Reading

Schematic drawing of graphene nanopore with self-integrated
optical antenna (gold) that enhances the optical readout signal (red) of DNA as it passes through a graphene nanopore.

Berkeley researchers have created the world’s first graphene nanopores that feature integrated optical antennas. The antennas open the door to high-speed optical nanopore sequencing of DNA.

New Insights on Carbonic Acid in Water

Saykally CPL CA Thumb

A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.

Peptoid Nanosheets at the Oil/Water Interface

Peptoid nanosheets are among the largest and thinnest free-floating organic crystals ever made, with an area-to-thickness equivalent of a plastic sheet covering a football field. Peptoid nanosheets can be engineered to carry out a wide variety of  functions.

Researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have developed peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between oil and water, opening the door to increased structural complexity and chemical functionality for a broad range of applications.

Of Metal Heads and Imaging

IPI is a fluorescent probe that can visualize changes in exchangeable iron stores in living cells upon iron supplementation or depletion.

Berkeley Lab researchers are developing molecular imaging probes and techniques to study metals in the brain that have been linked to disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

New Discovery in Living Cell Signaling

This gif of membrane-anchored Ras (red) and individual SOS molecules (green) shows individual SOS molecules corralled into 
nanofabricated patches where all the membrane-associated Ras molecules they activate can be trapped.

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Demonstrate First Size-based Chromatography Technique for the Study of Living Cells

Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can’t be obtained through conventional microscopy.

Puzzling Question in Bacterial Immune System Answered

Berkeley researchers have answered a central question about Cas9, an enzyme that plays an essential role in the bacterial immune system and is fast becoming a valuable tool for genetic engineering: How is Cas9 able to precisely discriminate between non-self DNA that must be degraded and self DNA that may be almost identical within genomes that are millions to billions of base pairs long.

Shapes of Things to Come: Exotic Shapes for Liquid Drops Have Many Possible Uses

Through a combination of water, oil and nanoparticle surfactants plus an external field, spherical droplets are being transformed into ellipsoids and other unusual shapes that could find many valuable uses.

Bringing Out the Best in X-ray Crystallography Data

Combining components of Rosetta and PHENIX, two successful software programs for creating 3D structural models of proteins and other biomolecules, Berkeley Lab researchers have created a new method for refining those models and making the best of available experimental data.