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Simulations Show Swirling Rings, Whirlpool-Like Structure in Subatomic ‘Soup’

Powerful supercomputer simulations of high-energy collisions between atomic cores provide new insights about the complex structure of a superhot fluid called the quark-gluon plasma.

Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-hunting Season at CERN’s LHC

Scientists at Berkeley Lab will be sifting through loads of new data expected from the latest experimental run at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

U.S. Joins the World in a New Era of Research at the Large Hadron Collider

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European research facility, start recording data from the highest-energy particle collisions ever achieved on Earth.

U.S. Scientists Celebrate the Restart of the Large Hadron Collider

With the collider back in action, the more than 1,700 U.S. scientists who work on LHC experiments are prepared to join thousands of their international colleagues to study the highest-energy particle collisions ever achieved in the laboratory.

What to Expect Next from the World’s Largest Particle Accelerator

Berkeley Lab researchers, Beate Heinemann and Peter Jacobs were on a recent panel of scientists that discussed the scientific implications of this new and improved accelerator.

DOE’s High-Speed Network to Boost Big Data Transfers by Extending 100G Connectivity across Atlantic

The DOE’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), managed by Berkeley Lab, is deploying four new high-speed transatlantic links, giving researchers at America’s national laboratories and universities ultra-fast access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other research sites in Europe.

Precision Physics of Antiatoms: Berkeley Lab Physicists Bound the Charge of Antihydrogen

Hydrogen is a neutral atom. Its single electron orbits a single proton, and the net effect is no electrical charge. But what about hydrogen’s antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen? Made of a positron that orbits an antiproton, the antihydrogen atom should be neutral too. Various results have indicated as much, but because the charge of antiatoms is

Beyond the Higgs Boson: A Detector Add-on Helps Scientists Look Deeper

Last month, ATLAS, the particle detector that helped find the Higg’s boson, got an upgrade. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN added a new set of sensors, called the Insertable b-Layer, or IBL, into the core of the detector. The IBL will be closer to particle collisions than previous sensors and contain more,

Does Antimatter Fall Up or Down?

Theory and observations support the view that antimatter experiences gravity just as ordinary matter does, but the evidence so far has been indirect. Indeed, some theorists speculate that antimatter is antigravitational, that it may fall “up” instead of “down.” Led by Berkeley Lab physicists, the ALPHA Collaboration at CERN has made direct measurements of the gravitational mass of atoms of antihydrogen, testing how they fall and in what direction.

A Flow of Heavy-Ion Results from the LHC

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider collides protons most of the year but switches to massive lead nuclei for a month. Collisions of these heavy ions reproduce the quark-gluon plasma that filled the universe millionths of a second after the big bang. Much of the program for quark-gluon plasma studies is shaped by theoretical and experimental contributions from Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Science Division, as shown by results from ALICE and other experiments during the LHC’s first lead-lead run just concluded.