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New Carbon Capture Membrane Boasts CO2 Highways

A new, highly permeable carbon capture membrane could lead to more efficient ways of separating carbon dioxide from power plant exhaust, preventing the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.

Assessing the Impact of Human-Induced Climate Change

The past century has seen a 0.8°C increase in average global temperature, and according to the IPCC, the overwhelming source of this increase has been emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants from human activities. What remains unclear is precisely what fraction of the observed changes in these climate-sensitive systems can confidently be attributed to human-related influences, rather than mere natural regional fluctuations in climate. So Gerrit Hansen of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and Dáithí Stone of Berkeley Lab developed and applied a novel methodology for answering this challenging question.

Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley Partner with Tsinghua on Energy and Climate

Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley announced they are partnering with Tsinghua University in Beijing to form the Berkeley Tsinghua Joint Research Center on Energy and Climate Change, a center that will aim to develop scientifically based clean energy solutions and the next generation of leaders to champion those solutions.

A New Way to Look at MOFs

An international collaboration led by Berkeley Lab’s Omar Yaghi has developed a technique called “gas adsorption crystallography” that provides a new way to study the process by which metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are able to store immense volumes of gases such as carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane.

A Simpler Way to Estimate the Feedback Between Permafrost Carbon and Climate

Researchers led by a scientist from Berkeley Lab have developed a simple model of permafrost carbon based on direct observations. Their approach could help climate scientists evaluate how well permafrost dynamics are represented in the Earth system models used to predict climate change.

Most Comprehensive Projections for West Antarctica’s Future Revealed

A new international study is the first to use a high-resolution, large-scale computer model, called Berkeley-ISICLES (BISICLES), to estimate how much ice the West Antarctic Ice Sheet could lose over the next couple of centuries, and how much that could add to sea-level rise. The results paint a clearer picture of West Antarctica’s future than was previously possible.

Unravelling the Mysteries of Carbonic Acid

Berkeley Lab researchers report the first detailed characterization of the hydration structure of carbon dioxide gas as it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. Though carbonic acid exists for only a fraction of a second, it imparts a lasting impact on Earth’s atmosphere and geology, and on the human body

North to Alaska: Researchers Rush to Understand Warming Trend

A group of scientists from the Atmospheric Measurement Research (ARM) Climate Research Facility won’t be looking for gold or oil this summer as they crisscross Alaska’s North Slope in an airplane. Instead, the ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V (ARM-ACME V) team—led by Sebastien Biraud from U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory—will run an aerial campaign

Berkeley Lab Scientist Invents New Technique to Understand Cloud Behavior

With two off-the-shelf digital cameras situated about 1 kilometer apart facing Miami’s Biscayne Bay, Berkeley Lab scientists David Romps and Rusen Oktem are collecting three-dimensional data on cloud behavior that have never been possible to collect before.

Energy Secretary Honors Berkeley Lab Scientists

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz has awarded Berkeley Lab scientists Bill Collins and Greg Bell with DOE Secretarial Honor Awards, which are the department’s highest form of non-monetary employee recognition.