News Center

When Rocket Science Meets X-ray Science

NASA and Berkeley Lab researchers have teamed up to explore next-generation spacecraft materials at the microscale using an X-ray technique that produces 3-D images. This work could help ensure future spacecraft survive the rigors of otherworldly atmospheres.

Workshop Focuses on the Unique Science Enabled by ALS-U

Visiting scientists gave input during a workshop last week on the range of new X-ray science made possible by a planned upgrade of the Advanced Light Source.

Chemistry on the Edge: Study Pinpoints Most Active Areas of Reactions on Nanoscale Particles

Defects and jagged surfaces at the edges of nanosized platinum and gold particles are key hot spots for chemical reactivity, researchers confirmed using a unique infrared probe.

7 Imaging Tools Pushing Science Forward

Berkeley Lab scientists are developing new ways to see the unseen. Here are seven imaging advances (recently reported in our News Center) that are helping to push science forward, from developing better batteries to peering inside cells to exploring the nature of the universe.   1. Seeing DNA nanostructures in 3-D DNA segments can serve as a

A New Way to Image Solar Cells in 3-D

Scientists have developed a way to use optical microscopy to map thin-film solar cells in 3-D as they absorb photons. The new method could help researchers learn new ways to boost photovoltaic efficiency.

Workshop Focuses in on Electron Microscopy

A “Future Electron Microscopy” workshop held Tuesday, Oct. 11, at the ALS User Support Building showcased the breadth and depth of electron microscopy at Berkeley Lab.

Seeing Atoms and Molecules in Action with an Electron ‘Eye’

A unique rapid-fire electron source—originally built as a prototype for driving next-generation X-ray lasers—will help scientists at Berkeley Lab study ultrafast chemical processes and changes in materials at the atomic scale.

Construction Begins on Major Upgrade to World’s Brightest X-ray Laser

Berkeley Lab scientists are developing key components for LCLS-II, a major X-ray laser upgrade and expansion project that will enable new atomic-scale explorations with up to 1 million ultrabright X-ray pulses per second.

Berkeley Lab Working on Key Components for LCLS-II X-ray Lasers

  X-ray free-electron lasers, first realized a decade ago, produce the brightest X-rays on the planet, and scientists tap into these unique X-rays to explore matter at the atomic scale and observe processes that occur in just quadrillionths of a second. As the name suggests, an X-ray free-electron laser requires electrons—lots of them, and in

Revealing the Fluctuations of Flexible DNA in 3-D

Scientists have captured the first high-resolution 3-D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached to gold nanoparticles, which could aid in the use of DNA segments as building blocks for molecular devices that function as nanoscale drug-delivery systems, markers for biological research, and components for electronic devices.