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A Supercool Component for a Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiment

A large titanium cryostat designed to keep its contents chilled to minus 148 degrees has completed its journey from Europe to South Dakota, where it will become part of a next-generation dark matter detector for the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment.

Early Career Spotlight: Zach Marshall Searches for Supersymmetry

Just five years after joining Berkeley Lab as a Physics Division fellow, Zach Marshall is co-leading an international team of researchers in search of supersymmetry — the theory that every known particle has a “superpartner” particle. Now with funding from an early career award announced last November, Marshall and his team are building a powerful super-scheduling platform that will help particle physicists process more data faster without investing in costly new computing infrastructure.

Next-Gen Dark Matter Detector in a Race to Finish Line

The race is on to build the most sensitive experiment designed to directly detect dark matter particles known as WIMPs. The LUX-ZEPLIN project has formally cleared a key construction milestone that will propel it toward its April 2020 goal for completion.

Notes from the Particle Physics Underground

The town of Lead South Dakota has a hidden gem: an enormous, underground mine that’s been retrofitted to accommodate large-scale particle physics experiments. These slideshows and videos give a sense of what it’s like to descend 4,850 feet below the surface and work on projects that could shine light on fundamental truths about the universe.

New Visitor Center in South Dakota Highlights Underground Science

The Sanford Lab Homestake Visitor Center, a facility that highlights Homestake Mine’s gold and silver past and particle physics future, held its grand opening ceremony on June 30.

First Results from LUX, the World’s Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector

The LUX dark matter experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility has announced its first results in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Following an initial three-month run, LUX has demonstrated that it has a sensitivity limit three times better than any previous dark matter search, establishing new bounds on possible properties of WIMPs.