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Researchers Catch Extreme Waves with High-Resolution Modeling

A new Berkeley Lab study shows that high-resolution models captured hurricanes and big waves that low-resolution ones missed. Better extreme wave forecasts are important for coastal cities, the military, the shipping industry, and surfers.

New Leaf Study Sheds Light on ‘Shady’ Past

A new study led by a Berkeley Lab research scientist highlights a literally shady practice in plant science that has in some cases underestimated plants’ rate of growth and photosynthesis, among other traits.

X-Rays Capture Unprecedented Images of Photosynthesis in Action

An international team of scientists is providing new insight into the process by which plants use light to split water and create oxygen. In experiments led by Berkeley Lab scientists, ultrafast X-ray lasers were able to capture atomic-scale images of a protein complex found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria at room temperature.

The Incredible Shrinking Particle Accelerator

Particle accelerators are on the verge of transformational breakthroughs—and advances in computing power and techniques are a big part of the reason. Long valued for their role in scientific discovery and in medical and industrial applications such as cancer treatment, food sterilization and drug development, particle accelerators, unfortunately, occupy a lot of space and carry

Nanoscale Tetrapods Could Provide Early Warning of a Material’s Failure

Light-emitting, four-armed nanocrystals could someday form the basis of an early warning system in structural materials by revealing microscopic cracks that portend failure.

Berkeley Lab to Lead 5 Exascale Projects, Support 6 Others

Scientists at Berkeley Lab will lead or play key roles in developing 11 critical research applications for next-generation supercomputers as part of DOE’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP). The ECP announced Sept. 7 that it has selected 15 application development proposals for full funding—of which Berkeley Lab will lead two and support four others—and seven proposals for “seed” funding, three of which will be led by Berkeley Lab, which will also support two others.

Energy Department to Invest $16 Million in Computer Design of Materials

The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Two four-year projects—including one team led by Berkeley Lab — will leverage the Lab’s expertise in materials and take advantage of superfast computers at DOE national laboratories to develop software for designing new functional materials to revolutionize applications in alternative and renewable energy, electronics, and more.

Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-hunting Season at CERN’s LHC

Scientists at Berkeley Lab will be sifting through loads of new data expected from the latest experimental run at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

Updated Workflows for New LHC

After a massive upgrade, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s most powerful particle collider is now smashing particles at an unprecedented 13 tera-electron-volts (TeV)—nearly double the energy of its previous run from 2010-2012. In just one second, the LHC can now produce up to 1 billion collisions and generate up to 10 gigabytes of

Some Like it Hot: Simulating Single Particle Excitations

Understanding and manipulating plasmons is important for their potential use in photovoltaics, solar cell water splitting, and sunlight-induced fuel production from CO2. Berkeley Lab researchers have used a real-time numerical algorithm to study both the plasmon and hot carrier within the same framework. That is critical for understanding how long a particle stays excited, and whether there is energy backflow from hot carrier to plasmon.