News Center

Newly Discovered ‘Design Rule’ Brings Nature-Inspired Nanostructures One Step Closer

peptoid thumbnail

Scientists aspire to build nanostructures that mimic the complexity and function of nature’s proteins, but are made of durable and synthetic materials. These microscopic widgets could be customized into incredibly sensitive chemical detectors or long-lasting catalysts, to name a few possible applications. A discovery by Berkeley Lab scientists is a step in that direction.

New Support for CAMERA to Develop Computational Mathematics for Experimental Facilities Research


With the advent of new technology, scientific facilities are collecting data at increasing rates and higher resolution. However, making sense of this data is becoming a major bottleneck. To address these growing needs, the Department of Energy has announced approval of a grant of $10.5 million over three years to expand the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications at Berkeley Lab.

ESnet’s Science DMZ Breaking Down Barriers, Speeding up Science

This map shows the location of universities which have deployed Science DMZs or similar architectures funded by the National Science Foundation.

From individual universities around the country to a consortium of research institutions stretching the length of the west coast, networking teams are deploying an infrastructure architecture known as the Science DMZ developed by the Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet ) to help researchers make productive use of ever-increasing data flows.

Celeste: A New Model for Cataloging the Universe

The Víctor M. Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, where the Dark Energy Camera is being used to collect image data for the DECam Legacy Survey. The glint off the dome is moonlight; the small and large Magellanic clouds can be seen in the background. (Image: Dustin Lang, University of Toronto)

A Berkeley Lab-based research collaboration of astrophysicists, statisticians and computer scientists has created a new statistical analysis model designed to enhance one of modern astronomy’s most time-tested tools: sky surveys.

Meet the High-Performance Single-Molecule Diode

Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Columbia University have
created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode using a combination of gold electrodes and an ionic solution. (Image courtesy of Latha Venkataraman, Columbia University)

Researchers from Columbia University and Berkeley Lab have created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode. Development of a functional single-molecule diode is a major pursuit of the electronics industry.

Supernova Hunting with Supercomputers

Simulation of the expanding debris from a supernova explosion (shown in red) running over and shredding a nearby star (shown in blue).
Image credit: Daniel Kasen, Berkeley Lab/ UC Berkeley

Berkeley researchers provide “roadmap” and tools for finding and studying Type Ia supernovae in their natural habitat

How a New Telescope Will Measure the Expansion of the Universe

Two-dimensional map of the sky that will identify the galaxies that will be the targets for our spectroscopic measurements once DESI is built. Source:

Michael Levi and David Schlegel, physicists at Berkeley Lab, discuss the future of the DESI project and how its forthcoming map will help scientists better understand dark energy.

Berkeley Researchers and Supercomputers to Help Create a Standard 3D Neuron Model


Before scientists can unlock the secrets of the human brain, they must fully understand neurons—the cells of our brain, spinal cord and overall nervous system. Thousands of detailed neuron images, from different organisms, currently sit in individual data collections across the globe, comprising several petabytes of data altogether. Despite this plethora of data, made possible

Bigger steps: Berkeley Lab researchers develop algorithm to make simulation of ultrafast processes possible

Rachel feature image

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a new algorithm that makes it easier to produce real-time numerical simulations of ultrafast physical phenomena, such as electrical charge transfer.

Making a Good Thing Better: Berkeley Lab Researchers Open a Possible Avenue to Better Electrolyte for Lithium Ion Batteries

X-ray absorption spectra, interpreted using first-principles electronic structure calculations, provide insight into the solvation of the lithium ion in propylene carbonate. (Image courtesy of Rich Saykally, Berkeley)

Berkeley Lab researchers carried out the first X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of a model electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries and may have found a pathway forward to improving LIBs for electric vehicles and large-scale electrical energy storage.