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Latest Supercomputers Enable High-Resolution Climate Models, Truer Simulation of Extreme Weather

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Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate model. But using some of the most powerful supercomputers now available, Berkeley Lab climate scientist Michael Wehner was able to complete a run in just three months. What he found was that not only were the simulations much closer to actual observations, but the high-resolution models were far better at reproducing intense storms, such as hurricanes and cyclones.

Berkeley Lab Study Reveals Molecular Structure of Water at Gold Electrodes

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Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.

Dispelling a Misconception About Mg-Ion Batteries

David Prendergast and Liwen Wan at the Molecular Foundry used supercomputer simulations to dispel a popular misconception about magnesium-ion batteries that should help advance the technology in the future. (Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt)

Berkeley Lab researchers, working under the JCESR Energy Hub, used supercomputer simulations to dispel a popular misconception about magnesium-ion batteries that should help advance the development of multivalent ion battery technology.

Dark Energy Survey Opens Second Season with Catalog of Stunning Deep-Space Images

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The Dark Energy Survey has just kicked off its second season of snapping shots of deep space with its 570-megapixel camera mounted on the Victor M. Blanco Telescope in Chile.

Confirmed: Stellar Behemoth Self-Destructs in a Type IIb Supernova

The Palomar 48 inch telescope. (Photo by: Iair Arcavi, Weizmann Instiute of Science)

Wolf-Rayet stars, more than 20 times as massive as the Sun and at least five times as hot, are relatively rare and often obscured. Scientists don’t know much about how they form, live and die.

An Inside Look at a MOF in Action

A unique inside look at the electronic structure of a highly touted metal-organic framework (MOF) as it is adsorbing carbon dioxide gas should help in the design of new and improved MOFs for carbon capture and storage.

Nobel Laureate Karplus is Longtime NERSC User

On Wednesday, Oct. 9, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists for pioneering methods in computational chemistry that have brought a deeper understanding of complex chemical structure and reactions in biochemical systems. These methods can precisely calculate how very complex molecules work and even predict the outcomes of very complex chemical reactions. One of the laureates — Martin Karplus of Harvard University — has been using supercomputers at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Berkeley Lab since 1998.

In Water as In Love, Likes Can Attract

Berkeley Lab researchers have shown that, contrary to the scientific axiom that only opposite charges attract, when hydrated in water, positively charged ions can pair up with one another.

Planck Mission Updates the Age of the Universe and What it Contains

At a March 21 NASA telephone news conference, scientists from the U.S. team participating in the European Space Agency’s Planck mission to map the cosmic microwave background (CMB) discussed Planck’s first cosmological results, including some surprising news. For one thing, the universe is 13.82 billion years old, a hundred million years older than previously thought,

Building the Massive Simulation Sets Essential to Planck Results

The Planck collaboration has released its first cosmological results, based on trillions of measurements of the cosmic microwave background. The results owe much to Berkeley Lab’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), including tens of millions of hours of massively parallel processing, plus the expertise of physicists and computational scientists in the Computational Cosmology Center (C3) who generated a quarter of a million simulated maps of the Planck sky, essential to the analysis.