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Creating the Coldest Cubic Meter in the Universe

As part of an international collaboration, Berkeley Lab scientists have helped create the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The cooled chamber—roughly the size of a vending machine—was chilled to 6 milliKelvin or -273.144 degrees Celsius in preparation for a forthcoming experiment that will study neutrinos, ghostlike particles that could hold the key to the existence of matter around us.

Hide & Seek: Sterile Neutrinos Remain Elusive

The Daya Bay Collaboration, an international group of scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called sterile neutrino, a possible new type of neutrino beyond the three known neutrino “flavors,” or types.

Searching for Cosmic Accelerators Via IceCube

In our universe there are particle accelerators 40 million times more powerful than the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, but scientists don’t know what or where these cosmic accelerators are. New results reported from “IceCube,” the neutrino observatory buried at the South Pole, may show the way.

Searching for Cosmic Accelerators Via IceCube

New results from IceCube, the neutrino observatory buried at the South Pole, may show the way to locating and identifying cosmic accelerators in our galaxy that are 40 million times more powerful than the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

Berkeley's Kam-Biu Luk Wins Panofsky Prize for Daya Bay Experiment

Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley physicist Kam-Biu Luk has been named by the American Physical Society to be a recipient of the 2014 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in experimental particle physics. He and Yifang Wang of China’s Institute of High Energy Physics will share the prize for their leadership roles in the Daya Bay neutrino experiment.

New Results from Daya Bay – Tracking the Disappearance of Ghostlike Neutrinos

New results about the oscillation of neutrinos – elusive, ghostlike particles that carry invaluable clues about the makeup of the early universe – have been announced by the Daya Bay Collaboration, an international experiment taking place outside of Hong Kong.

First Hundred Thousand Years of Our Universe

Berkeley Lab researchers take the furthest look back through time yet – 100 years to 300,000 years after the Big Bang – and find tantalizing new hints of clues as to what might have happened.

Assembling the First Detector Units of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR’s First Detector Units

In Memoriam: Stuart Freedman, Renowned Nuclear Physicist

Stuart Jay Freedman, a physicist in Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Science Division and professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, died November 9, 2012, at the age of 68. Freedman was a world-renowned investigator of fundamental physical laws whose many accomplishments include unique contributions to the study of neutrinos and the weak interaction.

Advancing Underground Science at South Dakota’s Sanford Lab

On Wednesday, May 30, the Sanford Underground Research Facility officially opened its Davis Campus, almost a mile deep in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The event brought over 60 visitors including officials from federal and state government, scientists from universities and national laboratories, and local and national media. Berkeley Lab is the U.S. Department of Energy’s lead institution for this marked advance in underground science.