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Calling All Photographers: Participate in Berkeley Lab’s Physics Photowalk Competition on May 16

Berkeley Lab is offering a special tour to photographers on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, in a local event that is part of a Global Physics Photowalk 2018 competition. Follow @BerkeleyLab and #LBNLphotowalk online for updates on the local event.

Can Strongly Lensed Type Ia Supernovae Resolve One of Cosmology’s Biggest Controversies?

Astrophysicists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth in the U.K. say strongly lensed Type Ia supernovae could help resolve a discrepancy in measurements of the universe’s accelerating expansion.

From Belgrade to Berkeley: A Postdoctoral Researcher’s Path in Particle Physics

After completing her Ph.D. thesis in calculating the mass of the W boson – a heavier-than-iron elementary particle that mediates one of the universe’s fundamental forces – physics researcher Aleksandra Dimitrievska is now testing components at Berkeley Lab for a scheduled upgrade of the world’s largest particle detectors.

Solving the Dark Energy Mystery: A New Assignment for a 45-Year-Old Telescope

Today, the dome closes on the previous science chapters of the 4-meter Mayall Telescope in Arizona so that it can prepare for its new role in creating the largest 3-D map of the universe. This map could help to solve the mystery of dark energy, which is driving the accelerating expansion of the universe.

Applying Machine Learning to the Universe’s Mysteries

Berkeley Lab physicists and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe’s greatest mysteries – they used neural networks to perform a deep dive into data simulating the subatomic particle soup that may have existed just microseconds after the big bang.

It All Starts With a ‘Spark’: Berkeley Lab Delivers Injector That Will Drive X-Ray Laser Upgrade

A team at Berkeley Lab has designed, built, and delivered a unique version of a device, called an injector gun, that can produce a steady stream of these electron bunches. The gun will be used to produce brilliant X-ray laser pulses at a rapid-fire rate of up to 1 million per second.

X-Rays Reveal ‘Handedness’ in Swirling Electric Vortices

Scientists used spiraling X-rays at Berkeley Lab to observe, for the first time, a property that gives left- or right-handedness to swirling electric patterns – dubbed polar vortices – in a layered material called a superlattice.

Star Mergers: A New Test of Gravity, Dark Energy Theories

Observations and measurements of a neutron star merger have largely ruled out some theories relating to gravity and dark energy, and challenged a large class of theories.

Creating a World of Make-Believe to Better Understand the Real Universe

Scientists are creating simulated universes – complete with dark matter mock-ups, computer-generated galaxies, quasi quasars, and pseudo supernovae – to better understand real-world observations.

Watching a Quantum Material Lose Its Stripes

In quantum materials, periodic stripe patterns can be formed by electrons coupled with lattice distortions. To capture the extremely fast dynamics of how such atomic-scale stripes melt and form, Berkeley Lab scientists used femtosecond-scale laser pulses at terahertz frequencies. Along the way, they found some unexpected behavior.