News Center

Filling in the Nuclear Data Gaps

Photo - Lee Bernstein, who leads the Nuclear Data Group in Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Science Division, at the beam line in Cave 0 of the Lab’s 88-Inch Cyclotron. (Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab)

Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Data Group is conducting new experiments to address common data needs in nuclear medicine, nuclear energy and fusion R&D, security, and counterproliferation work.

Berkeley Lab Awarded $4.6 Million for Transformational Agriculture Technologies

Two Berkeley Lab projects to "see" into the soil. (Credit: KateLeigh/istock.com)

ARPA-E has awarded Berkeley Lab $4.6 million for two projects to “see” into the soil and ultimately develop crops that take carbon out of the atmosphere. One technology aims to use electrical current to image the root system. The other will use neutron scattering to measure the distribution of carbon and other elements in the soil.

Laser R&D Focuses on Next-Gen Particle Collider

Photo - Wim Leemans, director of Berkeley Lab's Accelerator Technology & Applied Physics Division, chats with graduate students Joost Daniels, left, and Kelly Swanson in the BELLA laser control room. Berkeley Lab’s BELLA Center is the site of a laser plasma wakefield acceleration R&D effort and other laser experiments that could help set the stage for a next-generation particle collider. (Credit: Paul Mueller)

A set of new laser systems and proposed upgrades at Berkeley Lab’s BELLA Center will propel long-term plans for a more compact and affordable ultrahigh-energy particle collider.

7 Imaging Tools Pushing Science Forward

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Berkeley Lab scientists are developing new ways to see the unseen. Here are seven imaging advances (recently reported in our News Center) that are helping to push science forward, from developing better batteries to peering inside cells to exploring the nature of the universe.   1. Seeing DNA nanostructures in 3-D DNA segments can serve as a

Simulations Show Swirling Rings, Whirlpool-Like Structure in Subatomic ‘Soup’

Image - This hydrodynamic simulation shows the flow patterns, or “vorticity distribution,” from a smoke ring-like swirling fluid around the beam direction of two colliding heavy ions. The simulation provides new insight about the properties of a superhot fluid known as the quark-gluon plasma. (Credit: Berkeley Lab)

Powerful supercomputer simulations of high-energy collisions between atomic cores provide new insights about the complex structure of a superhot fluid called the quark-gluon plasma.

We Gather Here Today to Join Lasers and Anti-Lasers

Schematic shows anti-lasing mode of a device created by Berkeley Lab scientists. (Credit: Zi Jing Wong/UC Berkeley)

Berkeley Lab scientists have, for the first time, achieved both lasing and anti-lasing in a single device. Their findings lay the groundwork for developing a new type of integrated device with the flexibility to operate as a laser, an amplifier, a modulator, and a detector.

Planetarium Show Brings ‘Phantom’ Matter to Life

Image - A pioneering dark matter discovery by astronomer Vera Rubin, who is shown in this rendering peering through a telescope, is described in a new planetarium show. (Credit: "Phantom of the Universe")

A new planetarium show, produced in part by Berkeley Lab’s Michael Barnett, is designed to immerse audiences in the search for dark matter, which we have so far detected only through its gravitational effects.

The Incredible Shrinking Particle Accelerator

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Particle accelerators are on the verge of transformational breakthroughs—and advances in computing power and techniques are a big part of the reason. Long valued for their role in scientific discovery and in medical and industrial applications such as cancer treatment, food sterilization and drug development, particle accelerators, unfortunately, occupy a lot of space and carry

World’s Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Completes Search

The LZ water shield, currently housing the LUX experiment.

The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, which, with the help of Berkeley Lab researchers, operates beneath a mile of rock at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the Black Hills of South Dakota, has completed its search for the missing matter of the universe. At a meeting in the UK, LUX scientific collaborators presented the results from the detector’s final 20-month run.

Dark Energy Measured with Record-Breaking Map of 1.2 Million Galaxies

This is one slice through the map of the large-scale structure of the Universe from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Each dot in this picture indi-cates the position of a galaxy 6 billion years into the past. The image covers about 1/20th of the sky, a slice of the Universe 6 billion light-years wide, 4.5 billion light-years high, and 500 million light-years thick. Color indicates distance from Earth, ranging from yellow on the near side of the slice to purple on the far side. Galaxies are highly clustered, revealing superclusters and voids whose presence is seeded in the first fraction of a second after the Big Bang. This image contains 48,741 galaxies, about 3% of the full survey dataset. Grey patches are small regions without survey data. Credit: Daniel Eisenstein and SDSS-III

A team of hundreds of physicists and astronomers, including those from Berkeley Lab, have announced results from the largest-ever, three-dimensional map of distant galaxies. The team constructed this map to make one of the most precise measurements yet of the dark energy currently driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe.