News Center

Scientist Q&A: The Molecular Imaging Behind COVID-19 Breakthroughs

Berkeley Lab scientist who leads the development of a widely used data analysis software discusses the role of structural biology in vaccine and antiviral research.

Location, Location, Location: Regional Tau Deposits in Healthy Elders Predict Alzheimer Disease

Subtle memory deficits are common in normal aging as well as Alzheimer disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia in older adults. This makes AD difficult to diagnose in its early stages. As there is currently no effective treatment to slow or stop the progression of AD, it is important to identify early pathological brain

Are Gut Microbes the Key to Unlocking Anxiety?

The prevalence of anxiety disorders, already the most common mental illness in many countries, including the US, has surged during the novel coronavirus pandemic. A new study provides evidence that taking care of our gut microbiome may help mitigate some of that anxiety.

A Detailed Look Inside Tsetse Flies

To better understand the unique reproductive biology of tsetse flies, which are carriers of the parasites that cause a deadly infection known as African sleeping sickness, researchers explored the intact organs and tissues of tsetse flies using a powerful 3D X-ray imaging technique at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source.

How to Find Mutated Sperm? Just Go FISH

A test developed by Berkeley Lab scientists can quickly and easily detect whether sperm cells are carrying chromosomal defects, an advance that will help men who have undergone cancer treatment father healthy children.

The Odd Structure of ORF8: Scientists Map the Coronavirus Protein Linked to Immune Evasion and Disease Severity

A team of biologists who banded together to support COVID-19 science determined the atomic structure of a coronavirus protein thought to help the pathogen evade and dampen response from human immune cells. The structural map – which is now published in the journal PNAS, but has been open-access for the scientific community since August – has laid the groundwork for new antiviral treatments and enabled further investigations into how the newly emerged virus ravages the human body.

Cataloging Nature’s Hidden Arsenal: Viruses that Infect Bacteria

A new approach for studying phages-bacteria interactions will help scientists study the intricate offensive and defensive chemical tactics used by parasite and host. These microscopic battles have implications for medicine development, agricultural research, and climate science.

It’s All Connected: Your Genes, Your Environment, and Your Health

Berkeley Lab statistician Paul Williams seeks to explain how genetics and external factors interact to shape alcohol consumption, lung function, and weight gain – aspects of health that are on many of our minds during the the coronavirus pandemic and wildfires.

Interpreting the Human Genome’s Instruction Manual

Berkeley Lab bioscientists are part of a nationwide research project, called ENCODE, that has generated a detailed atlas of the molecular elements that regulate our genes. This enormous resource will help all human biology research moving forward.

Scaling Up Science During a Global-Scale Emergency

Our biomanufacturing experts are helping accelerate the development of new COVID-19-fighting technologies. Learn how the scientists at the ABPDU are collaborating with biotech companies to scale up and optimize production of coronavirus-targeting antibodies and a highly accurate rapid testing system.