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FIONA Measures the Mass Number of 2 Superheavy Elements: Moscovium and Nihonium

A team led by nuclear physicists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reported the first direct measurements of the mass numbers for the nuclei of two superheavy elements: moscovium, which is element 115, and nihonium, element 113. They obtained the results using FIONA, a new tool at Berkeley Lab that is designed to resolve the nuclear and atomic properties of the heaviest elements.

A Next Step for GRETA: A Better Gamma-Ray Detector

A new high-resolution gamma-ray detector system – designed to reveal new details about the structure and inner workings of atomic nuclei, and to elevate our understanding of matter and the stellar creation of elements – has passed an important project milestone.

Award Finalists Demonstrate Improved Nuclear Physics Code for Supercomputing

André Walker-Loud, a staff scientist at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), is co-leader of a team that is among the six finalists for the Association of Computing Machinery’s Gordon Bell Prize that will be awarded this month.

Gamma Rays, Watch Out: There’s a New Detector in Town

With funding from an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) award announced last year, NSD’s Heather Crawford and her team of researchers are developing a prototype for an ultrahigh-rate high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector that can count 2 to 5 million gamma rays per second while maintaining high resolution, allowing them to accurately measure the energy spectrum under extreme conditions.

Q&A: Berkeley Lab’s Spencer Klein Talks About IceCube Then and Now, and What’s Next

In this Q&A, Berkeley Lab physicist Spencer Klein, who has been a part of the IceCube collaboration since 2004, discusses Berkeley Lab’s historic contributions to IceCube, and IceCube’s contributions to science.

IceCube Neutrinos Point to Long-Sought Cosmic Ray Accelerator

An international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth.

Berkeley Lab Team Wins Data-Driven Scavenger Hunt for Simulated Nuclear Materials

Competing in a fictitious high-stakes scenario, a group of scientists at Berkeley Lab bested two dozen other teams in a months-long, data-driven scavenger hunt for simulated radioactive materials in a virtual urban environment.

CERN Ceremony Marks Groundbreaking for Accelerator Upgrade Involving U.S. National Labs

A groundbreaking ceremony today celebrates the start of civil engineering work for a major upgrade to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. When complete, the High-Luminosity LHC will produce five to seven times more proton-proton collisions than the currently operating LHC, powering new discoveries about our universe.

From Moon Rocks to Space Dust: Berkeley Lab’s Extraterrestrial Research

From moon rocks to meteorites, and from space dust to a dinosaur-destroying impact, the Department of Energy’s Berkeley Lab has a well-storied expertise in exploring samples of extraterrestrial origin.

Supercomputers Provide New Window Into the Life and Death of a Neutron

A team led by Berkeley Lab researchers has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity, known as the “nucleon axial coupling” or gA, that is central to our understanding of a neutron’s lifetime.