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Weaving a New Story for COFS and MOFs

An international collaboration led by Berkeley Lab scientists
has woven the first 3D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) from helical organic threads. The woven COFs display significant advantages in structural flexibility, resiliency and reversibility over previous COFs.

At the American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston: Berkeley Lab’s Omar Yaghi Discusses Capturing Carbon in the Presence of Water with MOFs and COFs

At the ACS Meeting in Boston, Berkeley Lab’s Omar Yaghi described the design of IRMOF-74-III compounds that can selectively capture carbon dioxide in the presence of water.

Unravelling the Mysteries of Carbonic Acid

Berkeley Lab researchers report the first detailed characterization of the hydration structure of carbon dioxide gas as it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. Though carbonic acid exists for only a fraction of a second, it imparts a lasting impact on Earth’s atmosphere and geology, and on the human body

Major Advance in Artificial Photosynthesis Poses Win/Win for the Environment

By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, a potentially game-changing new artificial photosynthesis system offers a win/win situation for the environment: solar-powered green chemistry using sequestered carbon dioxide.

A Better Way of Scrubbing CO2

Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a means by which the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants might one day be done far more efficiently and at far lower costs than today. By appending a diamine molecule to the sponge-like solid materials known as metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs), the researchers were able to more than triple the CO2-scrubbing capacity of the MOFs, while significantly reducing parasitic energy.

New Insights on Carbonic Acid in Water

A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.

Berkeley Lab Helps Capture Birth of Mineral in Real Time

Researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California Berkeley, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have used a high-powered electron microscope to capture the birth of calcium carbonate crystals. It is a first step, the researchers say, to better understanding how it might be possible to pull excess carbon dioxide from the air and store it in rock where it wouldn’t contribute to global warming.

An Inside Look at a MOF in Action

A unique inside look at the electronic structure of a highly touted metal-organic framework (MOF) as it is adsorbing carbon dioxide gas should help in the design of new and improved MOFs for carbon capture and storage.

A Path to Better MTV-MOFs:

A team of Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley researchers have developed a method for accurately predicting the ability of MTV-MOFs (multivariate metal organic frameworks) to scrub carbon dioxide from the exhaust gases of fossil fuel power plants.

New map shows global reach of Berkeley Lab’s geologic carbon sequestration research

At the southern tip of Australia, Berkeley Lab scientists are helping to verify that depleted natural gas reservoirs can be repurposed for use as geologic carbon sequestration sites. In Mississippi, they’re exploring whether it’s possible to produce electricity from the Earth’s heat using CO2, as well as store some of the CO2 permanently underground. Many