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Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-hunting Season at CERN’s LHC

Scientists at Berkeley Lab will be sifting through loads of new data expected from the latest experimental run at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

Is Your Digital Information More at Risk Today than it was Ten Years Ago?

It’s easy to form the mental image of a hacker hunched over a computer, probing a way to get your personal information, whether to sell it, acquire credit cards in your name or use your health insurance. It does happen, but University of New Mexico researchers, working with Steven Hofmeyr from Berkeley Lab, say it is not happening more frequently than it did a decade ago. Data breaches, in general, are not growing in size.

New Support for CAMERA to Develop Computational Mathematics for Experimental Facilities Research

With the advent of new technology, scientific facilities are collecting data at increasing rates and higher resolution. However, making sense of this data is becoming a major bottleneck. To address these growing needs, the Department of Energy has announced approval of a grant of $10.5 million over three years to expand the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications at Berkeley Lab.

New Mathematics Advances the Frontier of Macromolecular Imaging

A comprehensive understanding of complex nanostructures—like proteins and viruses—could lead to breakthroughs in some of the most challenging problems in biology and medicine. But because these objects are a thousand times smaller than the width of human hair, scientists can’t directly see into them to determine their shape and function.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Receive DOE Early Career Research Awards

Two researchers at Berkeley Lab were on the list of 44 recipients announced today as recipients of the Early Career Research Program award managed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

Between Micro and Macro, Berkeley Lab Mathematicians Model Fluids at the Mesoscale

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit. How the bubbles form at a surface, how they rise up and join together, what are the surface properties, what happens if the temperature increases slowly versus quickly—while these components might be understood experimentally, the mathematical models for the process of boiling are incomplete.

Building the Massive Simulation Sets Essential to Planck Results

The Planck collaboration has released its first cosmological results, based on trillions of measurements of the cosmic microwave background. The results owe much to Berkeley Lab’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), including tens of millions of hours of massively parallel processing, plus the expertise of physicists and computational scientists in the Computational Cosmology Center (C3) who generated a quarter of a million simulated maps of the Planck sky, essential to the analysis.

Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale?

A computer model of fluid flow in shale takes kerogen inclusions into account for the first time, allowing realistic predictions of reservoir productivity.

Modeling the Breaking Points of Metallic Glasses

Metallic glass alloys (or liquid metals) are three times stronger than the best industrial steel, but can be molded into complex shapes with the same ease as plastic. These materials are highly resistant to scratching, denting, shattering and corrosion. Mathematical methods developed by Berkeley Lab researcher Christopher Rycroft of the Computational Research Division help explain why liquid metals have wildly different breaking points, depending on how they are made.