News Center

Scientists Solve a Magnesium Mystery in Rechargeable Battery Performance

A Berkeley Lab-led research team has discovered a surprising set of chemical reactions involving magnesium that degrade battery performance even before the battery can be charged up. The findings could steer the design of next-gen batteries.

Scientists Decode the Origin of Universe’s Heavy Elements in the Light from a Neutron Star Merger

On Aug. 17, scientists around the globe were treated to near-simultaneous observations by separate instruments that would ultimately be confirmed as the first measurement of the merger of two neutron stars and its explosive aftermath.

International Team Reconstructs Nanoscale Virus Features from Correlations of Scattered X-rays

As part of an international research team Berkeley Lab researchers contributed key algorithms which helped achieve a goal first proposed more than 40 years ago – using angular correlations of X-ray snapshots from non-crystalline molecules to determine the 3D structure of important biological objects.

Assessing Regional Earthquake Risk and Hazards in the Age of Exascale

With emerging exascale supercomputers, researchers will soon be able to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail, as well as predict how these movements will impact energy infrastructure—from the electric grid to local power plants—and scientific research facilities.

Quantum Computation to Tackle Fundamental Science Problems

The observation that the number of transistors on a computer chip doubles roughly every two years has set the pace for our modern digital revolution—making smartphones, personal computers and current supercomputers possible. But some of the big problems that scientists need to tackle might be beyond the reach of conventional computers. Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring a drastically different kind of computing architecture based on quantum mechanics to solve some of science’s hardest problems.

Berkeley Lab Aims to Strengthen the Cybersecurity of the Grid

As the U.S. electricity grid continues to modernize, it will mean things like better reliability and resilience and lower environmental impacts, as well as new computing and communications technologies to monitor and manage the increasing number of devices that connect to the grid. However, that enhanced connectivity for grid operators and consumers also opens the door to hackers.

New Berkeley Lab Algorithms Extract 3-D Biological Structure From Limited Data

A new algorithmic framework called M-TIP helps researchers determine the molecular structure of proteins and viruses from X-ray free electron laser data, which is crucial in fields like biology and medicine.

Berkeley Lab’s Open-Source Spinoff Serves Science

Scientists used to come to Gregory Kurtzer of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s IT department a lot, asking for a better way to use software containers in a high-performance computing (HPC) environment. After a while he got tired of saying, “Sorry, not possible.” So he invented a solution and named it Singularity.

Attention Earthlings: Help Wanted in Finding a New Planet

Data research for a Berkeley Lab-led dark energy experiment benefits citizen science project that seeks the public’s help in the hunt for a hypothesized Neptune-like Planet Nine.

Longest Record of Continuous Carbon Flux Data is Now Publicly Available

Around the world—from tundra to tropical forests, and a variety of ecosystems in between—environmental researchers have set up micrometeorological towers to monitor carbon, water, and energy fluxes, which are measurements of how carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor and energy (heat) circulate between the soil, plants and atmosphere. Most of these sites have been continuously collecting