News Center

U.S. Scientists Celebrate the Restart of the Large Hadron Collider

With the collider back in action, the more than 1,700 U.S. scientists who work on LHC experiments are prepared to join thousands of their international colleagues to study the highest-energy particle collisions ever achieved in the laboratory.

What to Expect Next from the World’s Largest Particle Accelerator

Berkeley Lab researchers, Beate Heinemann and Peter Jacobs were on a recent panel of scientists that discussed the scientific implications of this new and improved accelerator.

Dynamic New App for Learning About Particle Physics Now Available

A free app for Android and Apple devices called The Particle Adventure makes checking out the world of quarks, dark matter, and particle accelerators as easy as tapping touchscreen icons. The science of particle physics is illustrated via categories including “How Do We Know Any of This?” and “Unsolved Mysteries.” You can skim through the major categories or dig deep into topics such as the discovery of the Higgs boson.

A Closer Look at the Perfect Fluid

By combining data from two high-energy accelerators, nuclear scientists have refined the measurement of a remarkable property of exotic matter known as quark-gluon plasma. The findings reveal new aspects of the ultra-hot, “perfect fluid” that give clues to the state of the young universe just microseconds after the big bang.

Natalie Roe Testifies Before Congress on Particle Physics’ Future

On June 10th in Washington D.C. Natalie Roe, Director of the Physics Division at Berkeley Lab, testified at a congressional subcommittee hearing on the future of particle physics, prompted by the recent release of the Particle Physics Project Prioritization report. In addition to detailing the excitement of particle physics’ past and present, Roe presented a

Precision Physics of Antiatoms: Berkeley Lab Physicists Bound the Charge of Antihydrogen

Hydrogen is a neutral atom. Its single electron orbits a single proton, and the net effect is no electrical charge. But what about hydrogen’s antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen? Made of a positron that orbits an antiproton, the antihydrogen atom should be neutral too. Various results have indicated as much, but because the charge of antiatoms is

Beyond the Higgs Boson: A Detector Add-on Helps Scientists Look Deeper

Last month, ATLAS, the particle detector that helped find the Higg’s boson, got an upgrade. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN added a new set of sensors, called the Insertable b-Layer, or IBL, into the core of the detector. The IBL will be closer to particle collisions than previous sensors and contain more,

Superheavy Chemistry, One Atom at a Time

It’s now more or less official: element 117 will have a seat at the periodic table. Earlier this month an international team of scientists that included researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s Nuclear Science Division found two atoms of superheavy element 117. The experiment, conducted at a particle accelerator at the GSI Helmholtz Center for

In Memoriam: Andrew Sessler, Former Laboratory Director, Acclaimed Physicist and Humanitarian

Andrew Sessler, former Laboratory Director and acclaimed physicist and humanitarian, has died.

Latest from ATLAS: Higgs Boson Behaves Just the Way it Should

At a CERN seminar November 26th, Aliaksandr (Sasha) Pranko of the Physics Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) presented key direct evidence that the “Higgs-like” particle discovered at CERN last year does what a Higgs is supposed to do: it couples not only to other bosons but to