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A Quantum Leap Toward Expanding the Search for Dark Matter

Through a new research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of High Energy Physics, a consortium of researchers from Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst will develop sensors that enlist the seemingly weird properties of quantum physics to probe for dark matter particles in new ways, with increased sensitivity, and in uncharted regions.

Berkeley Lab to Push Quantum Information Frontiers With New Programs in Computing, Physics, Materials, and Chemistry

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) this week announced support from the Department of Energy that significantly expands Berkeley Lab’s research efforts in quantum information science, an area of research that harnesses the phenomenon of quantum coherence, in which two or more particles are so tightly entangled that a change to one simultaneously affects the other. Quantum information science seeks to utilize this phenomenon to hold, transmit, and process information.

First Particle Tracks Seen in ProtoDUNE: the Prototype for an International Neutrino Experiment

The largest liquid-argon neutrino detector in the world has just recorded its first particle tracks, signaling the start of a new chapter in the story of the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). DUNE’s scientific mission is dedicated to unlocking the mysteries of neutrinos, the most abundant (and most mysterious) matter particles in the universe.

Gamma Rays, Watch Out: There’s a New Detector in Town

With funding from an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) award announced last year, NSD’s Heather Crawford and her team of researchers are developing a prototype for an ultrahigh-rate high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector that can count 2 to 5 million gamma rays per second while maintaining high resolution, allowing them to accurately measure the energy spectrum under extreme conditions.

American Physical Society Publishes 60th Anniversary Edition of the Review of Particle Physics

The latest edition of the Review of Particle Physics, a go-to resource for particle physicists published Aug. 17 in the American Physical Society’s Physical Review D journal, marks the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Berkeley Lab-based Particle Data Group that produces the Review.

A Supercool Component for a Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiment

A large titanium cryostat designed to keep its contents chilled to minus 148 degrees has completed its journey from Europe to South Dakota, where it will become part of a next-generation dark matter detector for the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment.

Q&A: Berkeley Lab’s Spencer Klein Talks About IceCube Then and Now, and What’s Next

In this Q&A, Berkeley Lab physicist Spencer Klein, who has been a part of the IceCube collaboration since 2004, discusses Berkeley Lab’s historic contributions to IceCube, and IceCube’s contributions to science.

CERN Ceremony Marks Groundbreaking for Accelerator Upgrade Involving U.S. National Labs

A groundbreaking ceremony today celebrates the start of civil engineering work for a major upgrade to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. When complete, the High-Luminosity LHC will produce five to seven times more proton-proton collisions than the currently operating LHC, powering new discoveries about our universe.

Q&A: Berkeley Lab Physics Researcher Discusses New Higgs Boson Result

Jennet Dickinson, a graduate student researcher at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, explains her role in a new particle physics result, announced today, that relates to the Higgs boson and it’s interaction with another particle, the top quark.

Supercomputers Provide New Window Into the Life and Death of a Neutron

A team led by Berkeley Lab researchers has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity, known as the “nucleon axial coupling” or gA, that is central to our understanding of a neutron’s lifetime.