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VIDEO: 5,000 Robots Merge to Map the Universe in 3D

How do you create the largest 3D map of the universe? It’s as easy as teaching 5,000 robots how to “dance.” DESI, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, is an experiment that will target millions of distant galaxies by automatically swiveling fiber-optic positioners (the robots) to point at them and gather their light. In creating this detailed map, scientists hope to learn more about dark energy, which is driving the accelerating expansion of the universe.

How Drought and Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution

One in 10 Americans depends on the Colorado River for bathing and drinking. Last fall’s record-high temperatures reduced Colorado snowpack in winter 2018 to 66 percent of normal, sparking concern over water shortages downstream and leaving water managers fearful of a repeat. Berkeley Lab hydrological science expert Bhavna Arora explains how unseasonably warm weather and drought can affect water quality.

Ancient Pigment Can Boost Energy Efficiency

Egyptian blue, derived from calcium copper silicate, was routinely used on ancient depictions of gods and royalty. Previous studies have shown that when Egyptian blue absorbs visible light, it then emits light in the near-infrared range. Now a team led by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has confirmed the pigment’s fluorescence can be 10 times stronger than previously thought.

Infrared Beams Show Cell Types in a Different Light

By shining highly focused infrared light on living cells, scientists at Berkeley Lab hope to unmask individual cell identities, and to diagnose whether the cells are diseased or healthy.

American Physical Society Publishes 60th Anniversary Edition of the Review of Particle Physics

The latest edition of the Review of Particle Physics, a go-to resource for particle physicists published Aug. 17 in the American Physical Society’s Physical Review D journal, marks the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Berkeley Lab-based Particle Data Group that produces the Review.

2018 Berkeley Lab Physics Photowalk Winners Announced

A photo featuring a view of UC Berkeley’s landmark Campanile building, the San Francisco cityscape and bay, and the south side of the Shyh Wang Hall building at Berkeley Lab was judged as the winner in a local Physics Photowalk photo competition organized by the Lab. The photo was submitted by Michael Dawson, an amateur photographer.

Remembering Berkeley Lab’s First Electrical Engineer: William R. ‘Bill’ Baker

William R. “Bill” Baker, who died May 4 at age 103, was a lifelong engineer with an unrelenting mind and boundless ingenuity. He was the first electrical engineer hired by Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the namesake of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

A Supercool Component for a Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiment

A large titanium cryostat designed to keep its contents chilled to minus 148 degrees has completed its journey from Europe to South Dakota, where it will become part of a next-generation dark matter detector for the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment.

Q&A: Berkeley Lab’s Spencer Klein Talks About IceCube Then and Now, and What’s Next

In this Q&A, Berkeley Lab physicist Spencer Klein, who has been a part of the IceCube collaboration since 2004, discusses Berkeley Lab’s historic contributions to IceCube, and IceCube’s contributions to science.

Q&A: Berkeley Lab Physics Researcher Discusses New Higgs Boson Result

Jennet Dickinson, a graduate student researcher at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, explains her role in a new particle physics result, announced today, that relates to the Higgs boson and it’s interaction with another particle, the top quark.