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VIDEO: 5,000 Robots Merge to Map the Universe in 3D

How do you create the largest 3D map of the universe? It’s as easy as teaching 5,000 robots how to “dance.” DESI, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, is an experiment that will target millions of distant galaxies by automatically swiveling fiber-optic positioners (the robots) to point at them and gather their light. In creating this detailed map, scientists hope to learn more about dark energy, which is driving the accelerating expansion of the universe.

Scientists Present New Clues to Cut Through the Mystery of Titan’s Atmospheric Haze

Experiments at Berkeley Lab have helped scientists to zero in on a low-temperature chemical mechanism that may help to explain the complex molecular compounds that make up the nitrogen-rich haze layer surrounding Titan, Saturn’s largest moon.

A Quantum Leap Toward Expanding the Search for Dark Matter

Through a new research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of High Energy Physics, a consortium of researchers from Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst will develop sensors that enlist the seemingly weird properties of quantum physics to probe for dark matter particles in new ways, with increased sensitivity, and in uncharted regions.

A Supercool Component for a Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiment

A large titanium cryostat designed to keep its contents chilled to minus 148 degrees has completed its journey from Europe to South Dakota, where it will become part of a next-generation dark matter detector for the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment.

Q&A: Berkeley Lab’s Spencer Klein Talks About IceCube Then and Now, and What’s Next

In this Q&A, Berkeley Lab physicist Spencer Klein, who has been a part of the IceCube collaboration since 2004, discusses Berkeley Lab’s historic contributions to IceCube, and IceCube’s contributions to science.

From Moon Rocks to Space Dust: Berkeley Lab’s Extraterrestrial Research

From moon rocks to meteorites, and from space dust to a dinosaur-destroying impact, the Department of Energy’s Berkeley Lab has a well-storied expertise in exploring samples of extraterrestrial origin.

Experiments at Berkeley Lab Help Trace Interstellar Dust Back to Solar System’s Formation

Experiments conducted at Berkeley Lab helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles – collected from Earth’s upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets – contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.

Berkeley Lab’s Julian Borrill Elected Co-Spokesperson of Next-Gen Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment

Julian Borrill, who leads the Computational Cosmology Center in Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division, has been elected co-spokesperson of CMB-S4, a next-generation ground-based experiment to study the faint relic radiation from the Big Bang.

Tiny Distortions in Universe’s Oldest Light Reveal Clearer Picture of Strands in Cosmic Web

Scientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe’s earliest light to map huge tubelike structures invisible to our eyes – known as filaments – that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters.

Chemical Sleuthing Unravels Possible Path to the Formation of Life’s Building Blocks in Space

Scientists have used experiments at Berkeley Lab to retrace the chemical steps leading to the creation of complex hydrocarbons in space. They showed pathways to forming 2-D carbon-based nanostructures in a mix of heated gases.