News Center

First ‘Telomere to Telomere’ Human Genome Reveals Secrets of the Centromere

Adapted from a news release by Robert Sanders When scientists announced the complete sequence of the human genome in 2003, they were fudging a bit. In fact, nearly 20 years later, about 8% of the genome has never been fully sequenced, largely because it consists of highly repetitive chunks of DNA that are hard to

Efficient and Healthy Schools Campaign Focuses On Indoor Air Quality

A new campaign, Efficient and Healthy Schools, led by Berkeley Lab will provide practical guidance on ventilation upgrades that can increase energy efficiency, lower costs, and improve the air at K-12 schools nationwide.

Safely Studying Dangerous Infections Just Got a Lot Easier

Soft X-ray tomography – a way to take gorgeously high-resolution, 3D images of cells – can help us study infections without risk of contamination. And now, the whole process takes just a fraction of the time and preparation required by other imaging methods.

New Technique Visualizes Every Pigment Cell of Zebrafish in 3D

A new technique images every pigment cell of a whole zebrafish in 3D. The work could lead to new insight into melanin’s role in skin cancer.

Cell ‘Fingerprinting’ Could Yield Long-Awaited Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic

A new process combining infrared light analysis and machine learning shows potential to break barriers in disease detection.

Jay Keasling Receives Distinguished Scientist Fellow Award

The renowned synthetic biologist will be given $1 million in funding to support bioenergy and bioproduct innovation.

Poorly Circulated Room Air Raises Potential Exposure to Contaminants by up to 6 Times

Having good room ventilation to dilute and disperse indoor air pollutants has long been recognized, and with the COVID-19 pandemic its importance has become all the more heightened. But new experiments by Berkeley Lab indoor air researchers show that certain circumstances will result in poor mixing of room air, meaning airborne contaminants may not be effectively dispersed and removed by building level ventilation.

ABPDU Celebrates a Decade of Bio-Innovation

-By Emily Scott Ten years ago, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced the opening of a brand new, 15,000-square-foot facility full of stainless steel state-of-the-art bioprocessing equipment – what we now know as the Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Process Development Unit, or ABPDU, was officially open for business. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy

Microbial Fingerprints for Cities

Vibrant cities around the world are made up of a unique blend of cultures, languages, cuisines, and – as scientists recently revealed – microbes.   Nearly 1,000 scientists from around the world, including three from Berkeley Lab, collected and analyzed microbial samples from public transit stations across 60 global cities. They probed ticket kiosks, benches, and

Empowering a Neighborhood to Breathe Easy

Companies like Purple Air and IQAir, with air pollution sensors that cost under $300, have brought air quality monitoring to the masses. But when Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Tom Kirchstetter looked at Purple Air’s map last year during wildfire season, he noticed a big hole in Richmond, a city of 110,000 to the north of Berkeley.