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Software System Award Honors Project Jupyter Team

The team behind Project Jupyter, an effort pioneered by Fernando Pérez, an assistant professor of statistics at UC Berkeley and staff scientist in the Usable Software Systems Group at Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division, has been honored with an Association of Computing Machinery Software System Award for developing a tool that has had a lasting influence on computing.

Berkeley Lab’s Julian Borrill Elected Co-Spokesperson of Next-Gen Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment

Julian Borrill, who leads the Computational Cosmology Center in Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division, has been elected co-spokesperson of CMB-S4, a next-generation ground-based experiment to study the faint relic radiation from the Big Bang.

Can Strongly Lensed Type Ia Supernovae Resolve One of Cosmology’s Biggest Controversies?

Astrophysicists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth in the U.K. say strongly lensed Type Ia supernovae could help resolve a discrepancy in measurements of the universe’s accelerating expansion.

The Mystery of the Star That Wouldn’t Die

Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley scientists were part of a team that helped to decipher one of the most bizarre spectacles ever seen in the night sky: A supernova that refused to stop shining, remaining bright far longer than an ordinary stellar explosion. What caused the event is puzzling.

Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-hunting Season at CERN’s LHC

Scientists at Berkeley Lab will be sifting through loads of new data expected from the latest experimental run at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

Is Your Digital Information More at Risk Today than it was Ten Years Ago?

It’s easy to form the mental image of a hacker hunched over a computer, probing a way to get your personal information, whether to sell it, acquire credit cards in your name or use your health insurance. It does happen, but University of New Mexico researchers, working with Steven Hofmeyr from Berkeley Lab, say it is not happening more frequently than it did a decade ago. Data breaches, in general, are not growing in size.

New Support for CAMERA to Develop Computational Mathematics for Experimental Facilities Research

With the advent of new technology, scientific facilities are collecting data at increasing rates and higher resolution. However, making sense of this data is becoming a major bottleneck. To address these growing needs, the Department of Energy has announced approval of a grant of $10.5 million over three years to expand the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications at Berkeley Lab.

New Mathematics Advances the Frontier of Macromolecular Imaging

A comprehensive understanding of complex nanostructures—like proteins and viruses—could lead to breakthroughs in some of the most challenging problems in biology and medicine. But because these objects are a thousand times smaller than the width of human hair, scientists can’t directly see into them to determine their shape and function.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Receive DOE Early Career Research Awards

Two researchers at Berkeley Lab were on the list of 44 recipients announced today as recipients of the Early Career Research Program award managed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

Between Micro and Macro, Berkeley Lab Mathematicians Model Fluids at the Mesoscale

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit. How the bubbles form at a surface, how they rise up and join together, what are the surface properties, what happens if the temperature increases slowly versus quickly—while these components might be understood experimentally, the mathematical models for the process of boiling are incomplete.