News Center

Brain Modulyzer Provides Interactive Window Into the Brain

Brain Modulyzer combines multiple coordinated views—such as heat maps, node link diagrams and anatomical views—of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data—like heat maps, node link diagrams and anatomical views—to provide context for brain connectivity data. (Sugeerth Murugesan, Berkeley Lab/UC Davis)

For the first time, a new tool developed at Berkeley Lab allows researchers to interactively explore the hierarchical processes that happen in the brain when it is resting or performing tasks. Scientists also hope that the tool can shed some light on how neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s spread throughout the brain.

The Incredible Shrinking Particle Accelerator

Exascale cover

Particle accelerators are on the verge of transformational breakthroughs—and advances in computing power and techniques are a big part of the reason. Long valued for their role in scientific discovery and in medical and industrial applications such as cancer treatment, food sterilization and drug development, particle accelerators, unfortunately, occupy a lot of space and carry

Longest Record of Continuous Carbon Flux Data is Now Publicly Available

This map shows all of the tower sites around the world that contributed observations to the FLUXNET 2015 data release. Credit: http://fluxnet.fluxdata.org/

Around the world—from tundra to tropical forests, and a variety of ecosystems in between—environmental researchers have set up micrometeorological towers to monitor carbon, water, and energy fluxes, which are measurements of how carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor and energy (heat) circulate between the soil, plants and atmosphere. Most of these sites have been continuously collecting

Energy Department to Invest $16 Million in Computer Design of Materials

NERSC Cray Cori supercomputer at Wang Hall - graphic panels installation - November 09, 2015.

The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Two four-year projects—including one team led by Berkeley Lab — will leverage the Lab’s expertise in materials and take advantage of superfast computers at DOE national laboratories to develop software for designing new functional materials to revolutionize applications in alternative and renewable energy, electronics, and more.

Data Centers Continue to Proliferate While Their Energy Use Plateaus

United States Data Center Energy Usage Report authors (from left) Dale Sartor, Richard Brown, Arman Shehabi, Sarah Smith. Energy Technologies Area. 06/172016

As the number of data centers continues to increase in the United States, the good news is that they are becoming much more energy efficient. A new report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found that electricity consumption by data centers nationwide, after rising rapidly for more than a decade, started to plateau in 2010 and has remained steady since, at just under 2 percent of total U.S. electricity consumption.

New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy

A new mathematical framework developed at Berkeley Lab allows researchers to capture fluid dynamics coupled to interface motion at unprecedented detail.

Berkeley Lab researchers in the Computing Sciences Division have developed a new mathematical framework that allows researchers to capture fluid dynamics at unprecedented detail. The work could be used in a range of applications, like optimizing the shape of a propeller blade and the ejection of ink droplets in printers.

Scientists Take a Major Leap Toward a ‘Perfect’ Quantum Metamaterial

Illustration - The wavelike pattern at the top shows the accordion-like structure of a proposed quantum material—an artificial crystal made of light—that can trap atoms in regularly spaced nanoscale pockets. These pockets can be made to hold a large collection of ultracold “host” atoms (green), slowed to a standstill by laser light, and individually planted “probe” atoms (red) that can be made to transmit quantum information in the form of a photon (particle of light). The lower panel shows how the artificial crystal can be reconfigured with light from an open (hyperbolic) geometry to a closed (elliptical) geometry, which greatly affects the speed at which the probe atom can release a photon. (Credit: Pankaj K. Jha/UC Berkeley)

Scientists have devised a way to build a “quantum metamaterial”—an engineered material with exotic properties not found in nature—using ultracold atoms trapped in an artificial crystal composed of light.

Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-hunting Season at CERN’s LHC

Image - A computerized representation of a proton-proton collision taken in the ALICE detector during the latest commissioning phase of CERN'S LHC, with low-intensity beams. (Credit: CERN)

Scientists at Berkeley Lab will be sifting through loads of new data expected from the latest experimental run at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

Updated Workflows for New LHC

ATLASEndcap1

After a massive upgrade, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s most powerful particle collider is now smashing particles at an unprecedented 13 tera-electron-volts (TeV)—nearly double the energy of its previous run from 2010-2012. In just one second, the LHC can now produce up to 1 billion collisions and generate up to 10 gigabytes of

A New Spin on Quantum Computing: Scientists Train Electrons with Microwaves

Photo: Researchers at Berkeley Lab's NCDX-II accelerator.

In what may provide a potential path to processing information in a quantum computer, researchers have switched an intrinsic property of electrons from an excited state to a relaxed state on demand using a device that served as a microwave “tuning fork.”