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VIDEO: The Making of the Largest 3D Map of the Universe

In this video, Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) project participants share their insight and excitement about the project and its potential for new and unexpected discoveries.

Dark Energy Instrument’s Lenses See the Night Sky for the First Time

On April 1 the dome of the Mayall Telescope near Tucson, Arizona, opened to the night sky, and starlight poured through the assembly of six large lenses that were carefully packaged and aligned for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument project, which is expected to provide the most precise measurement of the expansion of the universe, and new insight into dark energy.

Berkeley Lab Researcher Wins Machine-Learning Competition With Code That Sorts Through Simulated Telescope Data

To help solve a big data program for a new telescope that will conduct a major sky survey of the from the high desert of Chile, a scientific collaboration launched a competition to find the best way to train computers to identify the many types of objects it will be imaging.

How to Escape a Black Hole: Simulations Provide New Clues to What’s Driving Powerful Plasma Jets

New simulations led by researchers working at the Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley combine decades-old theories to provide new insight about the driving mechanisms in plasma jets that allow them to steal energy from black holes’ powerful gravitational fields and propel it far from their gaping mouths.

Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment

Chasing clues about the infant universe in relic light known as the cosmic microwave background, or CMB, Berkeley Lab scientists are devising more elaborate and ultrasensitive detector arrays to measure the properties of this light with increasing precision.

Topping Off a Telescope with New Tools to Explore Dark Energy

Key components for the sky-mapping Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, weighing about 12 tons, were hoisted atop the Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona, and bolted into place last week, marking a major project milestone.

Scientists Present New Clues to Cut Through the Mystery of Titan’s Atmospheric Haze

Experiments at Berkeley Lab have helped scientists to zero in on a low-temperature chemical mechanism that may help to explain the complex molecular compounds that make up the nitrogen-rich haze layer surrounding Titan, Saturn’s largest moon.

A Quantum Leap Toward Expanding the Search for Dark Matter

Through a new research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of High Energy Physics, a consortium of researchers from Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst will develop sensors that enlist the seemingly weird properties of quantum physics to probe for dark matter particles in new ways, with increased sensitivity, and in uncharted regions.

Berkeley Lab to Push Quantum Information Frontiers With New Programs in Computing, Physics, Materials, and Chemistry

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) this week announced support from the Department of Energy that significantly expands Berkeley Lab’s research efforts in quantum information science, an area of research that harnesses the phenomenon of quantum coherence, in which two or more particles are so tightly entangled that a change to one simultaneously affects the other. Quantum information science seeks to utilize this phenomenon to hold, transmit, and process information.

A Supercool Component for a Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiment

A large titanium cryostat designed to keep its contents chilled to minus 148 degrees has completed its journey from Europe to South Dakota, where it will become part of a next-generation dark matter detector for the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment.