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A Different Type of 2D Semiconductor

Berkeley Lab researchers have produced the first atomically thin 2D sheets of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites. These ionic materials exhibit optical properties not found in 2D covalent semiconductors such as graphene, making them promising alternatives to silicon for future electronic devices.

Surprising Discoveries about 2D Molybdenum Disulfide

Working at the Molecular Foundry, Berkeley Lab researchers used their “Campanile” nano-optical probe to make some surprising discoveries about molybdenum disulfide, a member of the “transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) semiconductor family whose optoelectronic properties hold great promise for future nanoelectronic and photonic devices.

Meet the High-Performance Single-Molecule Diode

Researchers from Columbia University and Berkeley Lab have created the world’s highest-performance single-molecule diode. Development of a functional single-molecule diode is a major pursuit of the electronics industry.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Observe Shortest Wavelength Plasmons Ever in Single Walled Nanotubes

Working at the Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab researchers have observed “Luttinger-liquid” plasmons in metallic single-walled nanotubes. This holds great promise for novel plasmonic and nanophotonic devices over a broad frequency range, including telecom wavelengths.

A Bright Light for Ultrafast Snapshots of Materials

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a bright, high-repetition-rate laser source that can generate XUV light for ultrafast materials dynamics and electronic structure studies.

Defects Can “Hulk-Up” Materials

A Berkeley Lab study has shown that just as exposure to gamma radiation transforms Bruce Banner into fictional superhero the Hulk, exposure to alpha-particle radiation can transform thermoelectric materials into far more powerful versions of themselves.

Channeling Valleytronics in Graphene

Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Advanced Light Source, have discovered topologically protected 1D electron conducting channels at the domain walls of bilayer graphene that should prove useful for valleytronics.

On the Road to Spin-orbitronics

Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a new way of manipulating the magnetic domain walls in ultrathin magnets that could one day revolutionize the electronics industry through a technology called “spin-orbitronics.”

New Pathway to Valleytronics

Berkeley Lab researchers have uncovered a promising new pathway to valleytronics, a potential quantum computing technology in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain 2D semiconductors.

Solving an Organic Semiconductor Mystery

Organic semiconductors are prized for light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic cells. As they can be printed from solution, they provide a highly scalable, cost-effective alternative to silicon-based devices. Uneven performances, however, have been a persistent problem. That’s now changed.