News Center

Poorly Circulated Room Air Raises Potential Exposure to Contaminants by up to 6 Times

Having good room ventilation to dilute and disperse indoor air pollutants has long been recognized, and with the COVID-19 pandemic its importance has become all the more heightened. But new experiments by Berkeley Lab indoor air researchers show that certain circumstances will result in poor mixing of room air, meaning airborne contaminants may not be effectively dispersed and removed by building level ventilation.

Microbial Fingerprints for Cities

Vibrant cities around the world are made up of a unique blend of cultures, languages, cuisines, and – as scientists recently revealed – microbes.   Nearly 1,000 scientists from around the world, including three from Berkeley Lab, collected and analyzed microbial samples from public transit stations across 60 global cities. They probed ticket kiosks, benches, and

How X-Rays Could Make Reliable, Rapid COVID-19 Tests a Reality

Vaccines are turning the tide in the pandemic, but the risk of infection is still present. Instant at-home tests would help us return to normal, but current options aren’t very accurate. A new discovery could help get reliable tests on the market.

Infant-Warming Device Proven Effective and Safe in Reducing Neonatal Mortality

Technology developed at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley shows a big drop in infant mortality in Rwanda hospitals.

Scientist Q&A: The Molecular Imaging Behind COVID-19 Breakthroughs

Berkeley Lab scientist who leads the development of a widely used data analysis software discusses the role of structural biology in vaccine and antiviral research.

A Detailed Look Inside Tsetse Flies

To better understand the unique reproductive biology of tsetse flies, which are carriers of the parasites that cause a deadly infection known as African sleeping sickness, researchers explored the intact organs and tissues of tsetse flies using a powerful 3D X-ray imaging technique at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source.

The Odd Structure of ORF8: Scientists Map the Coronavirus Protein Linked to Immune Evasion and Disease Severity

A team of biologists who banded together to support COVID-19 science determined the atomic structure of a coronavirus protein thought to help the pathogen evade and dampen response from human immune cells. The structural map – which is now published in the journal PNAS, but has been open-access for the scientific community since August – has laid the groundwork for new antiviral treatments and enabled further investigations into how the newly emerged virus ravages the human body.

VIDEOS: Science Collaborations Find a Way During COVID-19 Pandemic

Even an underground experiment 4,600 feet below a mountain in Central Italy, and a telescope instrument more than a mile high atop an Arizona mountaintop could not escape the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. In these videos, a Berkeley Lab scientist and two Berkeley Lab-affiliated researchers share their experiences of working in international collaborations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

X-ray Experiments Zero in on COVID-19 Antibodies

An international scientific team has discovered a neutralizing antibody, derived from the blood of a SARS survivor, that inhibits the closely related COVID-19-causing coronavirus. In a paper published this week in Nature, the scientists note that the antibody is already on an accelerated development path toward clinical trials.

Staff at Berkeley Lab’s X-Ray Facility Mobilize to Support COVID-19-Related Research

Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source X-ray facility has been recalled to action to support research related to COVID-19, the coronavirus disease that has already infected about 2 million people around the world.