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A Cage Made of Proteins, Designed With Help From the Advanced Light Source

Protein Cage

With help from Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, scientists from UCLA recently designed a cage made of proteins. The nano-sized cage could lead to new biomaterials and new ways to deliver drugs inside cells. It boasts a record breaking 225-angstrom outside diameter, the largest to date for a designed protein assembly. It also has a 130-angstrom-diameter

Is Interstellar’s Science So Stellar?

InterstellarAstronaut thumbnail

Interstellar features astronauts who take a wormhole ride to another galaxy to explore planets around a massive black hole. In a conversation last week, Berkeley Lab’s David Schlegel discussed the science in the movie and what Hollywood could learn from scientists about fantastic settings in outer space.

Berkeley Lab on U.S.-China Joint Announcement on Climate Change

Obama-Xi

On Nov. 11, U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping made a historic U.S.-China Joint Announcement on Climate Change outlining each country’s commitment to strengthen bilateral cooperation on climate change and to announce post-2020 actions in support of the effort to transition to low-carbon economies. Regarding China’s announced target of peaking of carbon

Berkeley Lab Scientists Recipients of 2015 Breakthrough Prizes

Doudna Breakthrough Feature

Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter and biochemist Jennifer Doudna were among the featured recipients of the 2015 Breakthrough Prizes in Fundamental Physics and Life Sciences.

Golden Approach to High-speed DNA Reading

Schematic drawing of graphene nanopore with self-integrated
optical antenna (gold) that enhances the optical readout signal (red) of DNA as it passes through a graphene nanopore.

Berkeley researchers have created the world’s first graphene nanopores that feature integrated optical antennas. The antennas open the door to high-speed optical nanopore sequencing of DNA.

Outsmarting Thermodynamics in Self-assembly of Nanostructures

Simulation of feedback driven self-assembly in mass assembly-line. The tilted network indicates aqueous flow in space (blue reservoir). The plasmon gauged potential (red) phothermally dissociates unwanted assemblies and re-assembles into the desired dimers.

Berkeley Lab researchers have achieved symmetry-breaking in a bulk metamaterial solution for the first time, a critical step game toward achieving new and exciting properties in metamaterials.

Nanotubes that Insert Themselves into Cell Membranes

An artist’s interpretation of a nanotube embedded within a cell membrane, allowing a DNA molecule to pass through. Credit: Xavier Studios

Berkeley Lab researchers have helped show that short carbon nanotubes can make excellent artificial pores within cell membranes. Moreover, these nanotubes, which are far more rugged than their biological counterparts, can self-insert into a cell membrane or other lipid bilayers.

New Insights on Carbonic Acid in Water

Saykally CPL CA Thumb

A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.

Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) Wins $1.1M Award

DESIlensblanksmall

The Heising-Simons Foundation has awarded $1.1M to the DESI project with the goal of helping to fabricate the unique optics needed to capture spectra of the young expanding universe.

A 3D Map of the Adolescent Universe

3D map of the cosmic web at a distance of 10.8 billion years from Earth,
generated from imprints of hydrogen gas observed in the spectrum of 24
background galaxies behind the volume. This is the first time that
large-scale structures in such a distant part of the Universe have been
directly mapped. Credit: Casey Stark (UC Berkeley) and Khee-Gan Lee (MPIA).

Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see today.