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‘Lasers Rewired’: Scientists Find a New Way to Make Nanowire Lasers

Image showing a nanolaser emitting bright light.

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have found a simple new way to produce nanoscale wires that can serve as bright, stable and tunable lasers—an advance toward using light to transmit data.

Graphene is Strong, But Is It Tough?

Polycrystalline graphene contains inherent nanoscale line and point defects that lead to significant statistical fluctuations in toughness and strength. (Credit: Berkeley Lab)

Graphene, a material consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms, has been touted as the strongest material known to exist, 200 times stronger than steel, lighter than paper, and with extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties. But can it live up to its promise?

Polar Vortices Observed in Ferroelectric

Ramesh vortices feature

Berkeley Lab researchers have observed polar vortices in a ferroelectric material that appear to be the electrical cousins of magnetic skyrmions. This discovery holds intriguing possibilities for advanced electronic devices and could also rewrite our basic understanding of ferroelectrics.

Weaving a New Story for COFS and MOFs

Omar Weaving art illustation feature

An international collaboration led by Berkeley Lab scientists
has woven the first 3D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) from helical organic threads. The woven COFs display significant advantages in structural flexibility, resiliency and reversibility over previous COFs.

A Nanoscale Look at Why a New Alloy is Amazingly Tough

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A team of researchers led by scientists from Berkeley Lab has identified several mechanisms that make a new material one of the toughest metallic alloys ever.

How to Train Your Bacterium

Peidong solar feature

Berkeley Lab researchers are using the bacterium Moorella thermoacetica to perform photosynthesis and also to synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles in a hybrid artificial photosynthesis system for converting sunlight into valuable chemical products.

Paul Alivisatos Wins the National Medal of Science

Paul Alivisatos

Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos has been named a winner of the 2015 National Medal of Science, the nation’s highest honor for lifetime achievement in fields of scientific research.

2D Islands in Graphene Hold Promise for Future Device Fabrication

This AFM image shows 2D F4TCNQ islands on graphene/BN that could be used to modify the graphene for electronic devices.

Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a new mechanism for assembling two-dimensional molecular “islands” that could be used to modify graphene at the nanometer scale for use in electronic devices.

Some Like it Hot: Simulating Single Particle Excitations

Changes of charge density, ‘sloshes‘ from one side to the other within the nanoparticle. Image is charge density at time, with the ground state charge density subtracted.

Understanding and manipulating plasmons is important for their potential use in photovoltaics, solar cell water splitting, and sunlight-induced fuel production from CO2. Berkeley Lab researchers have used a real-time numerical algorithm to study both the plasmon and hot carrier within the same framework. That is critical for understanding how long a particle stays excited, and whether there is energy backflow from hot carrier to plasmon.

Diamonds May Be the Key to Future NMR/MRI Technologies

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Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated that diamonds may hold the key to the future for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies. NMR/MRI signals were significantly strengthened through the hyperpolarization of carbon-13 nuclei in diamond using microwaves.