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Some Like it Hot: Simulating Single Particle Excitations

Changes of charge density, ‘sloshes‘ from one side to the other within the nanoparticle. Image is charge density at time, with the ground state charge density subtracted.

Understanding and manipulating plasmons is important for their potential use in photovoltaics, solar cell water splitting, and sunlight-induced fuel production from CO2. Berkeley Lab researchers have used a real-time numerical algorithm to study both the plasmon and hot carrier within the same framework. That is critical for understanding how long a particle stays excited, and whether there is energy backflow from hot carrier to plasmon.

Diamonds May Be the Key to Future NMR/MRI Technologies

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Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated that diamonds may hold the key to the future for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies. NMR/MRI signals were significantly strengthened through the hyperpolarization of carbon-13 nuclei in diamond using microwaves.

The Artificial Materials That Came in From the Cold

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Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a freeze-casting technique that enables them to design and create strong, tough and lightweight materials comparable to bones, teeth, shells and wood.

Nanocarriers May Carry New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy:

3HM nanocarriers for brain cancer therapy

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a new family of nanocarriers, called “3HM,” that meets all the size and stability requirements for effectively delivering therapeutic drugs to the brain for the treatment of a deadly form of cancer known as glioblastoma multiforme.

On the way to Multiband Solar Cells

Schematic of electron/hole transfer within intermediate band solar cell with GaNAs alloy as the light absorber.

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed an intermediate band solar cell that opens the door to high-efficiency solar cells and multicolor light emitters.

A New Way to Look at MOFs

A technique called “gas adsorption crystallography” that provides a new way to study the process by which metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) store immense volumes of gases such a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane. (Image by Hexiang Deng)

An international collaboration led by Berkeley Lab’s Omar Yaghi has developed a technique called “gas adsorption crystallography” that provides a new way to study the process by which metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are able to store immense volumes of gases such as carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane.

On the Road to ANG Vehicles

Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with flexible gas-adsorbing pores could make the driving range of adsorbed-natural-gas (ANG) cars comparable to that of a typical gasoline-powered car.

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) that feature flexible gas-adsorbing pores, giving them a high capacity for storing methane. This capability has the potential to help make the driving range of adsorbed-natural-gas (ANG) cars comparable to that of a typical gasoline-powered car.

Exciting Breakthrough in 2D Lasers

In the whispering gallery mode of a 2D excitonic laser made from a monolayer of tungsten disulfide and a microdisk resonator, the localization of the electric field at the edges of the resonator helps promote a high Q factor with low power consumption.

An important step towards next-generation ultra-compact photonic and optoelectronic devices has been taken with the realization of a two-dimensional excitonic laser. Berkeley Lab researchers have embedded a monolayer of tungsten disulfide into a microdisk resonator to achieve bright excitonic lasing at visible light wavelengths.

Computing A Textbook of Crystal Physics

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Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have developed a methodology that enabled them to compute piezoelectric constants for nearly 1,000 inorganic compounds.

A Different Type of 2D Semiconductor

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Berkeley Lab researchers have produced the first atomically thin 2D sheets of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites. These ionic materials exhibit optical properties not found in 2D covalent semiconductors such as graphene, making them promising alternatives to silicon for future electronic devices.