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Diamond Imperfections Pave the Way to Technology Gold

Using ultrafast 2D electronic spectroscopy, Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded unprecedented observations of energy moving through the atom-sized diamond impurities known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. Their results provide information on NV centers that is important for such highly promising advanced technologies as supersensitive detections of magnetic fields and quantum computing.

“Molecular Velcro” May Lead to Cost-Effective Alternatives to Natural Antibodies

Taking inspiration from the human immune system, researchers at Berkeley Lab have created a new material that can be programmed to identify an endless variety of molecules. The new material resembles tiny sheets of Velcro, each just one-hundred nanometers across. But instead of securing your sneakers, this molecular Velcro mimics the way natural antibodies recognize viruses and toxins, and could lead to a new class of biosensors.

Advanced Light Source Provides a New Look at Vanadium Dioxide

Researchers at the Advanced Light Source took a new look at vanadium dioxide, a correlated material that could be used to make energy-efficient ultrafast electronic switches.

3D Dynamic Imaging of Soft Materials

Through a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a unique graphene liquid cell, Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the three-dimensional motion of DNA connected to gold nanocrystals, the first reported use of TEM for 3D dynamic imaging of soft materials.

Raising the IQ of Smart Windows

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have designed a new material to make smart windows even smarter. The material is a thin coating of nanocrystals embedded in glass that can dynamically modify sunlight as it passes through a window. Unlike existing technologies, the coating provides selective control over visible light and heat-producing near-infrared (NIR) light, so windows can maximize both energy savings and occupant comfort in a wide range of climates.

New Twist in the Graphene Story:

Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Advanced Light Source, have discovered that in the making of bilayer graphene, a tiny structural twist arises that can lead to surprisingly strong changes in the material’s electronic properties

3D IR Images Now in Full Color

Berkeley Lab and University of Wisconsin researchers have created the first technique to offer full color IR tomography, a non-destructive 3D imaging process that provides molecular-level chemical information of unprecedented detail on biological and other specimens with no need to stain or alter the specimen.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Discover Universal Law for Light Absorption in 2D Semiconductors

Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a universal law of light absorption for 2D semiconductors. This discovery
not only provides new insight into the optical properties of 2D semiconductors and quantum wells, it should also open doors to exotic new optoelectronic and photonic technologies.

Tetrapod Quantum Dots Light the Way to Stronger Polymers

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed advanced opto-mechanical stress probes based on tetrapod quantum dots (tQDs) that allow precise measurement of the tensile strength of polymer fibers with minimal impact on the polymer’s mechanical properties. These fluorescent tQDs could lead to stronger, self-repairing polymer nanocomposites.

The Semiconductor Industry Gets a Sharper Vision of the Future

The world’s most advanced extreme-ultraviolet microscope is about to go online at Berkeley Lab, and the queue of semiconductor companies waiting to use it already stretches out the door. The much-anticipated SHARP microscope was conceived and built by scientists at Berkeley Lab’s Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) and will provide semiconductor companies with the means to push their chip-making technology to new levels of miniaturization and complexity.