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Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage

A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab has observed chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions in a material with reversible electrical properties – a combination that could lead to more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information, even after they’ve been turned off.

The Best Topological Conductor Yet: Spiraling Crystal Is the Key to Exotic Discovery

A team of researchers working at Berkeley Lab has discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples that have a spiral-staircase structure. The team’s result is reported in the March 20 edition of the journal Nature.

Engineering Living ‘Scaffolds’ for Building Materials

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have developed a platform that uses living cells as “scaffolds” for building self-assembled composite materials. The technology could open the door to self-healing materials and other advanced applications in bioelectronics, biosensing, and smart materials.

Scientists Take a Deep Dive Into the Imperfect World of 2D Materials

A team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab has learned how natural nanoscale defects can enhance the properties of tungsten disulfide, a 2D material.

When Semiconductors Stick Together, Materials Go Quantum

A simple method developed by a Berkeley Lab-led team could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines – superthin devices with extraordinary electronic behavior. Such an advancement could help to revolutionize a number of industries aiming for energy-efficient electronic systems – and provide a platform for exotic new physics.

How to Catch a Magnetic Monopole in the Act

A research team led by Berkeley Lab has created a nanoscale “playground” on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called “monopoles.” The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin to store data.

Big Data at the Atomic Scale: New Detector Reaches New Frontier in Speed

A superfast detector installed on an electron microscope at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry will reveal atomic-scale details across a larger sample area than could be seen before, and produce movies showing chemistry in action and changes in materials.

Nanocrystals Get Better When They Double Up With MOFs

Researchers from Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have designed a dual-purpose material out of a self-assembling MOF (metal-organic framework)-nanocrystal hybrid that could one day be used to store carbon dioxide emissions and to manufacture renewable fuels.

Revealing Hidden Spin: Unlocking New Paths Toward High-Temperature Superconductors

Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered that electron spin is key to understanding how cuprate superconductors can conduct electricity without loss at high temperature.

Topological Matters: Toward a New Kind of Transistor

An experiment conducted at Berkeley Lab has demonstrated, for the first time, electronic switching in an exotic, ultrathin material that can carry a charge with nearly zero loss at room temperature. Researchers demonstrated this switching when subjecting the material to a low-current electric field.