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Tiny Distortions in Universe’s Oldest Light Reveal Clearer Picture of Strands in Cosmic Web

Scientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe’s earliest light to map huge tubelike structures invisible to our eyes – known as filaments – that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters.

Underground Neutrino Experiment Could Provide Greater Clarity on Matter-Antimatter Imbalance

Scientists working on the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment have shown that they can shield a sensitive, scalable germanium detector array from background radioactivity – a critical step to developing a large experiment to study the nature of neutrinos and probe the universe’s matter-antimatter imbalance.

Can Strongly Lensed Type Ia Supernovae Resolve One of Cosmology’s Biggest Controversies?

Astrophysicists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth in the U.K. say strongly lensed Type Ia supernovae could help resolve a discrepancy in measurements of the universe’s accelerating expansion.

From Belgrade to Berkeley: A Postdoctoral Researcher’s Path in Particle Physics

After completing her Ph.D. thesis in calculating the mass of the W boson – a heavier-than-iron elementary particle that mediates one of the universe’s fundamental forces – physics researcher Aleksandra Dimitrievska is now testing components at Berkeley Lab for a scheduled upgrade of the world’s largest particle detectors.

Solving the Dark Energy Mystery: A New Assignment for a 45-Year-Old Telescope

Today, the dome closes on the previous science chapters of the 4-meter Mayall Telescope in Arizona so that it can prepare for its new role in creating the largest 3-D map of the universe. This map could help to solve the mystery of dark energy, which is driving the accelerating expansion of the universe.

Applying Machine Learning to the Universe’s Mysteries

Berkeley Lab physicists and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe’s greatest mysteries – they used neural networks to perform a deep dive into data simulating the subatomic particle soup that may have existed just microseconds after the big bang.

It All Starts With a ‘Spark’: Berkeley Lab Delivers Injector That Will Drive X-Ray Laser Upgrade

A team at Berkeley Lab has designed, built, and delivered a unique version of a device, called an injector gun, that can produce a steady stream of these electron bunches. The gun will be used to produce brilliant X-ray laser pulses at a rapid-fire rate of up to 1 million per second.

X-Rays Reveal ‘Handedness’ in Swirling Electric Vortices

Scientists used spiraling X-rays at Berkeley Lab to observe, for the first time, a property that gives left- or right-handedness to swirling electric patterns – dubbed polar vortices – in a layered material called a superlattice.

How the Earth Stops High-Energy Neutrinos in Their Tracks

In an analysis of data from an experiment embedded in Antarctic ice, a research collaboration including scientists from Berkeley Lab has demonstrated that the Earth stops high-energy neutrinos – particles that only very rarely interact with matter.

A Flight Path to Physics Success

In a previous career with the U.S. Air Force, Sandra Miarecki flew high above the Earth’s surface. She retired from the Air Force in 2007 to pursue a new calling in physics that would set her sights on particles traveling into the depths of the Earth.