News Center

Better Predicting Earthquake Damage to Infrastructure with Faster Computing

Researchers at Berkeley Lab are using high-performance computing systems to better predict how structures will respond to an earthquake along one of the Bay Area’s most dangerous faults.

How Does Climate Change Affect Mountainous Watersheds That Give Us Our Water?

Ecologist Heidi Steltzer, a Fort Lewis College professor and member of the Department of Energy’s Watershed Function Scientific Focus Area (SFA) project led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, studies how reduced snowpack and earlier snowmelt caused by climate change impact water supply in high-mountain areas. She is a contributing lead author of a new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate.

New $100M Innovation Hub to Accelerate R&D for a Secure Water Future

The National Alliance for Water Innovation, which is led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been awarded a five-year, $100-million Energy-Water Desalination Hub by DOE to address water security issues in the United States.

How California Wildfires Can Impact Water Availability

In recent years, wildfires in the western United States have occurred with increasing frequency and scale. Climate change scenarios in California predict prolonged periods of drought with potential for conditions even more amenable to wildfires. The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide up to 70% of the state’s water resources, yet there is little known on how

Tiny Toxins: How Algal Blooms Affect Coastal Systems Through a Complex Web of Interactions

A Q&A with scientist Michelle Newcomer on looking for unexpected causes of harmful algal blooms. Harmful and nuisance algal blooms are thought to have a number of contributing causal factors, including a build-up of nutrients, unusually high water temperatures, and extreme weather events such as floods and drought. But an understanding of the connectivity between these triggers is missing, as is an ability to predict the onset of the blooms.

Wildfires Could Permanently Alter Alaska’s Forest Composition

This summer, Alaska has experienced record high temperatures and devastating wildfires. If such events become more frequent, how might that impact our northernmost forests? A team of researchers projected that the combination of climate change and increased wildfires will cause the iconic evergreen conifer trees of Alaska to get pushed out in favor of broadleaf deciduous trees, which shed their leaves seasonally.

Amazon Rainforest Absorbing Less Carbon Than Expected

Agriculture, forestry, and other types of land use account for 23% of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, yet at the same time natural land processes absorb the equivalent of almost a third of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels and industry. How long will the Amazon rainforest continue to act as an effective carbon sink?

Cool Roofs Can Help Shield California’s Cities Against Heat Waves

A new study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory shows that if every building in California sported “cool” roofs by 2050, these roofs would help contribute to protecting urbanites from the consequences of dangerous heatwaves.

Two Berkeley Lab Researchers Receive DOE Early Career Research Awards

Two scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science to receive significant funding for research through its Early Career Research Program.

Can We Reuse Polluted Water? Yes, Add Bacteria

Every year, hydraulic fracturing of oil and gas wells generates billions of gallons of contaminated water. Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the CO School of Mines believe microbes could be the key to turning this waste into a resource.