News Center

Berkeley Lab Scientist’s Work Deciphering Early Universe Secrets Garners 2021 Gruber Cosmology Prize

A trio of physicists – including Uroš Seljak of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory – has been awarded the 2021 Gruber Cosmology Prize for their work studying the large-scale structure of the universe as well as the properties of its first instant of existence.

The Spintronics Technology Revolution Could Be Just a Hopfion Away

A research team co-led by Berkeley Lab has created and observed quasiparticles called 3D hopfions at the nanoscale (billionths of a meter) in a magnetic system. The discovery could advance high-density, high-speed, low-power, yet ultrastable magnetic memory “spintronics” devices.

Missing Baryons Found in Far-Out Reaches of Galactic Halos

Researchers have channeled the universe’s earliest light – a relic of the universe’s formation known as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) – to solve a missing-matter mystery and learn new things about galaxy formation. Their work could also help us to better understand dark energy and test Einstein’s theory of general relativity by providing new details about the rate at which galaxies are moving toward us or away from us.

U.S. Magnet Development Project for CERN Particle Collider Upgrade Moves Forward

The U.S. Department of Energy has formally approved a key milestone in the High-Luminosity LHC Accelerator Upgrade Project being carried out at eight U.S. institutions, including the DOE’s Berkeley Lab.

Researchers Hunt for New Particles in Particle Collider Data

Berkeley Lab researchers participated in a study that used machine learning to scan for new particles in three years of particle-collision data from CERN’s ATLAS detector.

Applying Quantum Computing to a Particle Process

A team of researchers at Berkeley Lab used a quantum computer to successfully simulate an aspect of particle collisions that is typically neglected in high-energy physics experiments, such as those that occur at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

AI Finds More Than 1,200 Gravitational Lensing Candidates

A research team with participation by Berkeley Lab physicists has used artificial intelligence to identify more than 1,200 possible gravitational lenses – objects that can be powerful markers for the distribution of dark matter. The count, if all of the candidates turn out to be lenses, would more than double the number of known gravitational lenses.

Study: X-Rays Surrounding ‘Magnificent 7’ May Be Traces of Sought-After Particle

A new study, led by a theoretical physicist at Berkeley Lab, suggests that never-before-observed particles called axions may be the source of unexplained, high-energy X-ray emissions surrounding a group of neutron stars.

Scientists Say Farewell to Daya Bay Site, Proceed with Final Data Analysis

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment collaboration – which made a precise measurement of an important neutrino property eight years ago, setting the stage for a new round of experiments and discoveries about these hard-to-study particles – has finished taking data. Though the experiment is formally shutting down, the collaboration will continue to analyze its complete dataset to improve upon the precision of findings based on earlier measurements.

90 Years of Neutrino Science

Berkeley Lab has a long history of participating in neutrino experiments and discoveries in locations ranging from a site 1.3 miles deep at a nickel mine in Ontario, Canada, to an underground research site near a nuclear power complex northeast of Hong Kong, and a neutrino observatory buried in ice near the South Pole.