News Center

Improved Desalination Process Also Removes Toxic Metals to Produce Clean Water

A UC Berkeley-led research team in collaboration with Berkeley Lab has discovered a way to simplify the removal of toxic metals, like mercury and boron, during desalination to produce clean water, while at the same time potentially capturing valuable metals, such as gold.

Scientists Design New Framework for Clean Water

A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has designed a new crystalline material that targets and traps copper ions from wastewater with unprecedented precision and speed. The technology offers the water industry and the research community the first blueprint for a water-remediation technology that scavenges heavy metal ions with a measure of control, which far surpasses the current state of the art.

Could the Answer to Groundwater Resources Come From High in the Sky?

A new computational approach developed by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory offers a high-tech yet simple method for estimating groundwater: it pairs high-resolution images derived by satellite with advanced computer modeling to estimate aquifer volume change from observed ground deformation.

Polluted Wastewater in the Forecast? Try A Solar Umbrella

Evaporation ponds, commonly used in many industries to manage wastewater, can occupy a large footprint and often pose risks to birds and other wildlife, yet they’re an economical way to deal with contaminated water. Now researchers at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated a way to double the rate of evaporation by using solar energy and taking advantage of water’s inherent properties, potentially reducing their environmental impact.

New $100M Innovation Hub to Accelerate R&D for a Secure Water Future

The National Alliance for Water Innovation, which is led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been awarded a five-year, $100-million Energy-Water Desalination Hub by DOE to address water security issues in the United States.

How California Wildfires Can Impact Water Availability

In recent years, wildfires in the western United States have occurred with increasing frequency and scale. Climate change scenarios in California predict prolonged periods of drought with potential for conditions even more amenable to wildfires. The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide up to 70% of the state’s water resources, yet there is little known on how

Tiny Toxins: How Algal Blooms Affect Coastal Systems Through a Complex Web of Interactions

A Q&A with scientist Michelle Newcomer on looking for unexpected causes of harmful algal blooms. Harmful and nuisance algal blooms are thought to have a number of contributing causal factors, including a build-up of nutrients, unusually high water temperatures, and extreme weather events such as floods and drought. But an understanding of the connectivity between these triggers is missing, as is an ability to predict the onset of the blooms.

Moving Forward on Desalination

A Q&A with scientist Jeff Urban, who explains forward osmosis and how Berkeley Lab is pushing the frontiers of this emerging technology.

Can We Reuse Polluted Water? Yes, Add Bacteria

Every year, hydraulic fracturing of oil and gas wells generates billions of gallons of contaminated water. Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the CO School of Mines believe microbes could be the key to turning this waste into a resource.

Berkeley Lab Technology Provides Clarity Amid Hawaiian Water Contamination Concerns

For years, routine testing has shown that watersheds of the Mahaulepu Valley and Waikomo Stream in southeast Kauai frequently contain high counts of potentially pathogenic fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). To better understand the cause of the high FIB counts, the DOH commissioned a study by Berkeley Lab microbial ecologists Gary Andersen and Eric Dubinsky. After using a powerful microbial detection tool called the PhyloChip, the scientists concluded that most of the past monitoring results were false positives.