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Technique Matters: A Different Way to Make a Cathode May Mean Better Batteries

Berkeley Lab researcher Marca Doeff (Credit: Kelly Owen/Berkeley Lab)

Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide, or NMC, is one of the most promising chemistries for better lithium batteries, especially for electric vehicle applications, but scientists have been struggling to get higher capacity out of them. Now researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have found that using a different method to make the material can offer substantial improvements.

Cool Roofs in China Offer Enhanced Benefits During Heat Waves

The greater urban area of Guangzhou is outlined in the center of each figure. A midday urban heat island effect is clearly visible. The results of increased roof albedos are shown in the righthand column.

It is well established that white roofs can help mitigate the urban heat island effect, reflecting the sun’s energy back into space and reducing a city’s temperature under normal weather conditions. In a new study of Guangzhou, China, Berkeley Lab researchers working with Chinese scientists found that during a heat wave, the effect is significantly more pronounced.

New Hybrid Electrolyte For Solid-State Lithium Batteries

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Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a novel electrolyte for use in solid-state lithium batteries that overcomes many of the problems that plague other solid electrolytes while also showing signs of being compatible with next-generation cathodes.

Team of Appraisers Across Six States Find Home Buyers Will Pay Premium for Solar Homes

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Photovoltaics added value to homes in six markets, according to a new report led by a Berkeley Lab researcher and a home appraisal expert. Seven appraisers from across six states determined the value that PV systems added to single-family homes.

A New Way to Look at MOFs

A technique called “gas adsorption crystallography” that provides a new way to study the process by which metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) store immense volumes of gases such a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane. (Image by Hexiang Deng)

An international collaboration led by Berkeley Lab’s Omar Yaghi has developed a technique called “gas adsorption crystallography” that provides a new way to study the process by which metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are able to store immense volumes of gases such as carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane.

Berkeley Lab Hosts Bay Area Battery Summit

2015 Bay Area Battery Summit - The Energy Storage Landscape: Challenges and Opportunities. Speakers, panel discussions, alternative fuel vehicles display, poster session - November 04, 2015 at Berkeley Lab Bldg.50 auditorium.

More than 200 people attended the 2015 Bay Area Battery Summit at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on Nov. 3 to discuss how to promote transformative energy storage technologies. The purpose of the Summit was to bring scientists together with policymakers and business to discuss what more could be done—whether in labs, universities, industry, Congress, or

Battery Mystery Solved: Atomic-Resolution Microscopy Answers Longstanding Questions About Lithium-Rich Cathode Material

Colin Ophus (left) and Alpesh Khushalchand Shukla in front of the TEAM 0.5 microscope at the Molecular Foundry.

Using complementary microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory say they have solved the structure of lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides, a potentially game-changing battery material and the subject of intense debate in the decade since it was discovered.

On the Road to ANG Vehicles

Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with flexible gas-adsorbing pores could make the driving range of adsorbed-natural-gas (ANG) cars comparable to that of a typical gasoline-powered car.

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) that feature flexible gas-adsorbing pores, giving them a high capacity for storing methane. This capability has the potential to help make the driving range of adsorbed-natural-gas (ANG) cars comparable to that of a typical gasoline-powered car.

Berkeley Lab Awarded $8 Million for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research

Adam Weber and Jeffrey Urban at ALS SAXS/WAXS Beamline 7.3.3.

With commitments from leading car manufacturers to hydrogen technologies and the first ever fuel cell electric vehicle to go on sale later this year, interest is once again swelling in this carbon-free technology. Now, Berkeley Lab has been awarded $8 million for two new multi-lab research projects, one to find new materials for hydrogen storage, led by Jeff Urban, and another for optimizing fuel-cell performance and durability, led by Adam Weber.

Cyclotron Road Leads Energy Entrepreneurs Across the Innovation Gap

Sebastien Lounis (left) and Ilan Gur head up Cyclotron Road. (Photo credit: Berkeley Lab)

With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, Cyclotron Road, a new technology-to-market program launched by Berkeley Lab last year, is now entering its second year and seeking applications for a second cohort of scientist-entrepreneurs. The six Cyclotron Road teams in the first cohort have so far brought in more than $2 million in new funding from government grants and private investors.