News Center

Smallest. Transistor. Ever.

Schematic of a transistor with a molybdenum disulfide channel and 1 nanometer carbon nanotube gate. (Credit: Sujay Desai/UC Berkeley)

A research team led by Berkeley Lab material scientists has created a transistor with a working 1-nanometer gate, breaking a size barrier that had been set by the laws of physics. The achievement could be a key to extending the life of Moore’s Law.

We’re Not in Kansas Anymore: Fluorescent Ruby Red Roofs Stay as Cool as White

Berkeley Lab researchers Sharon Chen and Paul Berdahl hold up their prototype coating made from ruby powder and synthetic ruby crystals. (Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab)

Elementary school science teaches us that in the sun, dark colors get hot while white stays cool. Now new research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found an exception: scientists have determined that certain dark pigments can stay just as cool as white by using fluorescence, the re-emission of absorbed light.

Nanoscale Tetrapods Could Provide Early Warning of a Material’s Failure


Light-emitting, four-armed nanocrystals could someday form the basis of an early warning system in structural materials by revealing microscopic cracks that portend failure.

Researchers Build World’s Largest Database Of Crystal Surfaces And Shapes


Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with the Materials Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), have created the world’s largest database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes to date. Dubbed Crystalium, this new open-source database can help researchers design new materials for technologies in which surfaces and interfaces play

Energy Department to Invest $16 Million in Computer Design of Materials

NERSC Cray Cori supercomputer at Wang Hall - graphic panels installation - November 09, 2015.

The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Two four-year projects—including one team led by Berkeley Lab — will leverage the Lab’s expertise in materials and take advantage of superfast computers at DOE national laboratories to develop software for designing new functional materials to revolutionize applications in alternative and renewable energy, electronics, and more.

5 Nanoscience Research Projects That Could Deliver Big Results

Peptoid Nanotube

Berkeley Lab researchers are using the science of the very small to help solve big challenges. That’s because, at the nanoscale—the scale of molecules and proteins—new and exciting properties emerge that can possibly be put to use. Here are five projects, now underway and recently highlighted in the News Center, which promise big results from the

Berkeley Lab Scientists Grow Atomically Thin Transistors and Circuits


In an advance that helps pave the way for next-generation electronics and computing technologies—and possibly paper-thin gadgets —Berkeley Lab scientists developed a way to chemically assemble transistors and circuits that are only a few atoms thick.

Scientists See Electron Bottleneck in Simulated Battery

A scanning electron microscopy image of vanadium pentoxide nanowires. The inset shows a ball-and-stick model of vanadium pentoxide's atomic structure before and after inserting lithium ions. (Credit: Texas A&M University)

An international team of scientists that includes Berkeley Lab researchers has revealed how interactions between electrons and ions can slow down the performance of vanadium pentoxide, a material considered key to the next generation of batteries.

Massive Trove of Battery and Molecule Data Released to Public

Kristin Persson - Materials Sciences Division

The Materials Project, a Google-like database of material properties aimed at accelerating innovation, has released an enormous trove of data to the public, giving scientists working on fuel cells, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, and a host of other advanced materials a powerful tool to explore new research avenues. But it has become a particularly important resource for researchers working on batteries.

Copper is Key in Burning Fat

Chris Chang and UC Berkeley graduate student Sumin Lee carry out experiments to find proteins that bind to copper and potentially influence the storage and burning of fat. (Credit: Peg Skorpinski/UC Berkeley)

A new study led by a Berkeley Lab scientist and UC Berkeley professor establishes for the first time copper’s role in fat metabolism, further burnishing the metal’s reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology.