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Opening a New Route to Photonics

In this adiabatic elimination scheme, the movement of light through two outer waveguides is controlled via a “dark” middle waveguide that does not accumulate any light. (Image by Zhosia Rostomian)

Berkeley scientists have developed a technique for effectively controlling pulses of light in closely packed nanoscale waveguides, an essential requirement for ultrahigh density, ultracompact integrated photonic circuitry.

A New Look at Surface Chemistry

Jim Ciston feature image

A multi-institutional team of researchers, including scientists from Berkeley Lab, have used a new scanning electron microscopy technique to resolve the unique atomic structure at the surface of a material. This new technique holds promise for the study of catalysis, corrosion and other critical chemical reactions.

A Bright Light for Ultrafast Snapshots of Materials

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a way to produce  high-repetition-rate XUV light for obtaining rapid, sharp images of a material’s electronic structure.

Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a bright, high-repetition-rate laser source that can generate XUV light for ultrafast materials dynamics and electronic structure studies.

Investigating Buried Interfaces in Ferroelectric Materials

Fadley feature

Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the Soleil Synchrotron in Paris have developed a new technique for investigating buried interfaces in ferroelectric materials.

On-demand X-rays at Synchrotron Light Sources

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Researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) have developed an “X-rays on demand” technique in which ALS users can have access to the X-ray beams they want without affecting beams for other users.

Defects Can “Hulk-Up” Materials

Junqaio Wu Hulk feature

A Berkeley Lab study has shown that just as exposure to gamma radiation transforms Bruce Banner into fictional superhero the Hulk, exposure to alpha-particle radiation can transform thermoelectric materials into far more powerful versions of themselves.

CLAIRE Brings Electron Microscopy to Soft Materials

CLAIRE image of Al nanostructures with an inset that shows a cluster of six Al nanostructures.

Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Molecular Foundry, have invented a technique called “CLAIRE” that extends the incredible resolution of electron microscopy to the non-invasive nanoscale imaging of soft matter, including biomolecules, liquids, polymers, gels and foams.

Channeling Valleytronics in Graphene

Feng Wang IR feature image

Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Advanced Light Source, have discovered topologically protected 1D electron conducting channels at the domain walls of bilayer graphene that should prove useful for valleytronics.

Major Advance in Artificial Photosynthesis Poses Win/Win for the Environment

Peidong feature image

By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, a potentially game-changing new artificial photosynthesis system offers a win/win situation for the environment: solar-powered green chemistry using sequestered carbon dioxide.

Electrolyte Genome Could Be Battery Game-Changer

Berkeley Lab scientist Kristin Persson and her electrolyte genome team.

A new breakthrough battery—one that has significantly higher energy, lasts longer, and is cheaper and safer—will likely be impossible without a new material discovery. And a new material discovery could take years, if not decades, since trial and error has been the best available approach. But Berkeley Lab scientist Kristin Persson says she can take some of the guesswork out of the discovery process with her Electrolyte Genome.