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Bridge Over Coupled Waters: Scientists 3D-Print All-Liquid ‘Lab on a Chip’

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have 3D-printed an all-liquid “lab on a chip” that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications – from making battery materials to screening drug candidates.

Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage

A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab has observed chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions in a material with reversible electrical properties – a combination that could lead to more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information, even after they’ve been turned off.

VIDEO: The Making of the Largest 3D Map of the Universe

In this video, Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) project participants share their insight and excitement about the project and its potential for new and unexpected discoveries.

Climate Scientists Partner with San Francisco to be Ready for Future Storms

Berkeley Lab climate experts have partnered with the City and County of San Francisco and Silvestrum Climate Associates to assess how climate change may influence the intensity of atmospheric rivers and associated precipitation, and how those changes may impact San Francisco and its infrastructure.

Dark Energy Instrument’s Lenses See the Night Sky for the First Time

On April 1 the dome of the Mayall Telescope near Tucson, Arizona, opened to the night sky, and starlight poured through the assembly of six large lenses that were carefully packaged and aligned for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument project, which is expected to provide the most precise measurement of the expansion of the universe, and new insight into dark energy.

Breakthrough Study of Cell Signaling Holds Promise for Immune Research and Beyond

For the first time ever, scientists have imaged the process by which an individual immune system molecule is switched on in response to a signal from the environment. The new work, described in a paper recently published in Science, provides an enormous leap forward in our understanding of how T cells detect viruses and may provide unique insights into autoimmune diseases and cancer immunotherapy.

The Best Topological Conductor Yet: Spiraling Crystal Is the Key to Exotic Discovery

A team of researchers working at Berkeley Lab has discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples that have a spiral-staircase structure. The team’s result is reported in the March 20 edition of the journal Nature.

Bright Skies for Plant-Based Jet Fuels

With an estimated daily fuel demand of more than 5 million barrels per day, the global aviation sector is incredibly energy-intensive and almost entirely reliant on petroleum-based fuels. But a new analysis by Berkeley Lab shows that sustainable plant-based bio-jet fuels could be competitive with conventional fuels if current development and scale-up initiatives continue to push ahead successfully.

Sea Quark Surprise Reveals Deeper Complexity in Proton Spin Puzzle

New data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) add detail – and complexity – to an intriguing puzzle that scientists have been seeking to solve: how the building blocks that make up a proton contribute to its spin.

Uncovering Uncultivated Microbes in the Human Gut

A human’s health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body’s interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However, previous studies have estimated that only 50 percent of species in the gut microbiome have a sequenced genome, in part because many species have not yet been cultivated for study.