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Using Bacteria to Accelerate CO2 Capture in Oceans

You may be familiar with direct air capture, or DAC, in which carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere in an effort to slow the effects of climate change. Now a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has proposed a scheme for direct ocean capture. Removing CO2 from the oceans will enable them to continue to do their job of absorbing excess CO2 from the atmosphere.

Capturing Carbon With Inspiration From Battery Chemistry

The need for negative emissions technologies to address our climate crisis has become increasingly clear. At the rate that our planet is emitting carbon dioxide – adding about 50 gigatons every year – we will have to remove carbon dioxide at the gigaton scale by 2050 in order to achieve “net zero” emissions.

Using Hundred-Year-Old Chemistry to Capture Carbon Directly From Air

Scientists at Berkeley Lab are working on new approaches to achieve direct air capture of carbon dioxide. Andrew Haddad, a researcher in Berkeley Lab’s Energy Technologies Area with a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry, talks about how a Nobel Prize-winning chemistry concept from more than a century ago inspired his idea for efficiently capturing CO2.

CUORE Team Places New Limits on the Bizarre Behavior of Neutrinos

Researchers at the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) announced this week that they had placed some of the most stringent limits yet on the strange possibility that the neutrino is its own antiparticle. CUORE has spent the last three years patiently waiting to see evidence of a distinctive nuclear decay process, only possible if neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same particle. Their new data shows that this decay doesn’t happen for trillions of trillions of years, if it happens at all.

Achieving Climate Goals Will Require Transformational Changes

The third and final installment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Sixth Assessment Report calls for aggressive and comprehensive actions if we are to achieve net zero emissions by mid-century. It finds we still need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions drastically, beyond what governments have pledged, and that this emissions gap is exacerbated by implementation gaps despite the mitigation efforts underway.

Berkeley Lab Team Hunts for Carbon in Soil Without Getting Their Hands Dirty

Physicists and soil scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have teamed up to develop a new method for finding carbon stored in the soil by plants and microbes. This new method for measuring carbon pulled out of the air promises to be an important tool for fighting climate change and developing more ecologically friendly forms of agriculture.

Scientists Uncover Surprising New Clues to Exotic Superconductors’ Superpowers

Unconventional superconductors carry electrical current with zero resistance in ways that defy our previous understanding of physics. A recent study led by Berkeley Lab could help researchers advance future applications in next-gen energy storage, supercomputing, and magnetic levitating trains.

A Laser-Powered Upgrade to Cancer Treatment

Biologists and particle accelerator physicists have teamed up to develop more effective and more accessible cancer treatments.

How X-Rays Can Make Better Batteries

In this Q&A, ALS senior staff scientist David Shapiro and Stanford materials science professor William Chueh share how their pioneering X-ray techniques can help researchers understand how battery materials work in real time at the atomic scale.

Safely Studying Dangerous Infections Just Got a Lot Easier

Soft X-ray tomography – a way to take gorgeously high-resolution, 3D images of cells – can help us study infections without risk of contamination. And now, the whole process takes just a fraction of the time and preparation required by other imaging methods.