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First ‘Telomere to Telomere’ Human Genome Reveals Secrets of the Centromere

Adapted from a news release by Robert Sanders When scientists announced the complete sequence of the human genome in 2003, they were fudging a bit. In fact, nearly 20 years later, about 8% of the genome has never been fully sequenced, largely because it consists of highly repetitive chunks of DNA that are hard to

Safely Studying Dangerous Infections Just Got a Lot Easier

Soft X-ray tomography – a way to take gorgeously high-resolution, 3D images of cells – can help us study infections without risk of contamination. And now, the whole process takes just a fraction of the time and preparation required by other imaging methods.

Three Berkeley Lab Scientists Receive AAAS Fellowship

Three staff researchers and one affiliate have been elected into the 2021 class of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Crystallography for the Misfit Crystals

As the name implies, crystallography requires crystals – specifically, purified samples of the molecule of interest, coaxed into a crystal form. But most molecules form powders composed of jumbled granules, not picture-ready crystals. A new computer algorithm, combined with a state-of-the-art laser, can adapt X-ray crystallography for the many not-so-neat-and-tidy compounds that scientists seek to study.

New Device Advances Commercial Viability of Solar Fuels

A research team has developed a new artificial photosynthesis device component with remarkable stability and longevity as it selectively converts sunlight and carbon dioxide into two promising sources of renewable fuels – ethylene and hydrogen.

Chloro-phylling in the Answers to Big Questions

Photosynthesis – the enzyme-based process of converting carbon dioxide into food, using water and sunlight – is literally the foundation of life on Earth, and understanding the reaction at an atomic level could lead to vast production of renewable fuels made from greenhouse gases sucked out of the air. A Berkeley Lab team has been uncovering precise, step-by-step details of photosynthesis for years. We spoke to two members, co-lead author and senior scientist Vittal Yachandra and co-first author and postdoctoral researcher Philipp Simon, about their latest study, shooting stuff with lasers, and why they chose this field.

A New Way to Make Chemicals Not Found in Nature

Adapted from a UC Berkeley news release. Synthetic biologists have successfully engineered microbes to make chemicals cheaply and more sustainably. However, researchers have been limited by the fact that microbes can only make molecules using chemical reactions seen in nature. A collaboration between scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley has engineered the microbe E.

New Technique Gets the Drop On Enzyme Reactions

Researchers develop an efficient method for studying fast biochemical reactions as they happen in real time

Cell ‘Fingerprinting’ Could Yield Long-Awaited Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic

A new process combining infrared light analysis and machine learning shows potential to break barriers in disease detection.

Jay Keasling Receives Distinguished Scientist Fellow Award

The renowned synthetic biologist will be given $1 million in funding to support bioenergy and bioproduct innovation.