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Scientists Uncover Surprising New Clues to Exotic Superconductors’ Superpowers

Unconventional superconductors carry electrical current with zero resistance in ways that defy our previous understanding of physics. A recent study led by Berkeley Lab could help researchers advance future applications in next-gen energy storage, supercomputing, and magnetic levitating trains.

How X-Rays Can Make Better Batteries

In this Q&A, ALS senior staff scientist David Shapiro and Stanford materials science professor William Chueh share how their pioneering X-ray techniques can help researchers understand how battery materials work in real time at the atomic scale.

With a Little Help, New Optical Material Assembles Itself

A research team led by Berkeley Lab has demonstrated an optical material that self-assembles from tiny concentric nanocircles. Their work could enable the large-scale manufacturing of nanocomposites for fiberoptic telecommunications systems as well as for buildings, automobiles, and aerospace.

Technique Tunes Into Graphene Nanoribbons’ Electronic Potential

Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have discovered how to directly measure the unique magnetic properties of superthin graphene nanoribbons. The breakthrough could lead to high-speed, low-power nanoscale data storage technologies.

These Tiny Liquid Robots Never Run Out of Juice as Long as They Have Food

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated the first self-powered, aqueous robot that runs continuously without electricity. The technology has potential as an automated chemical synthesis or drug delivery system for pharmaceuticals.

LED Material Shines Under Strain

With a simple stretch, a thin semiconductor material can achieve near 100% light-emission efficiency at all brightness levels. The discovery, reported by scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley in the journal Science, has implications for energy-efficient mobile devices and lighting applications.

Scientists Uncover a Different Facet of Fuel Cell Chemistry

X-ray beams at the Advanced Light Source allowed researchers to “see” oxygen gas molecules adhere to a specially prepared electrode surface, an important step in the electrochemical reaction taking place in fuel cells.

What if We Could Give Viruses a One-Two Punch?

Researchers at Stanford and Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have developed virus-killing molecules called peptoids. The technology could make possible an emerging category of antiviral drugs that could treat everything from herpes and COVID-19 to the common cold.

One-of-a-Kind Course Aims to Build the Bioeconomy Workforce

A new course that takes place at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Process Development Unit gives UC Berkeley students hands-on experience with bioprocessing equipment, preparing them for careers in the biopharmaceutical, industrial biotech, or food tech industries.

Discoveries at the Edge of the Periodic Table: First Ever Measurements of Einsteinium

Since element 99 – einsteinium – was discovered in 1952 at Berkeley Lab from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study characterizing some of its properties, opening the door to a better understanding of the remaining transuranic elements of the actinide series.