News Center

Discoveries at the Edge of the Periodic Table: First Ever Measurements of Einsteinium

Since element 99 – einsteinium – was discovered in 1952 at Berkeley Lab from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study characterizing some of its properties, opening the door to a better understanding of the remaining transuranic elements of the actinide series.

Scientists Recruit New Atomic Heavyweights in Targeted Fight Against Cancer

Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new methods for the large-scale production, purification, and use of the radioisotope cerium-134, which could serve as a PET imaging radioisotope for a highly targeted cancer treatment known as alpha-particle therapy.

Jennifer Doudna Wins 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, a professor at UC Berkeley and faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab, is co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her co-discovery of CRISPR-Cas9, a groundbreaking genetic engineering technology.

2 Berkeley Lab Scientists, Visiting Scientist Elected as New Members of Honorary Society

Two Berkeley Lab scientists and a visiting scientist are among the newest elected members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences – a 240-year-old honorary society that recognizes accomplished scholars, scientists and artists in academia, the humanities, arts, business, and government.

Q&A With Eric Seaborg: Science Writer, Author, and Outdoorsman

In this Q&A, Eric Seaborg shares memories of his father, Glenn Seaborg, and relates his experiences as a science writer, author, and president of the American Discovery Trail Society, which has established a hiking trail spanning the U.S. – from Point Reyes National Seashore in California to Cape Henlopen State Park in Delaware.

New MOF Can Take On Toxic Sulfur Dioxide Gas

An international team has developed a robust material that can selectively take in toxic sulfur dioxide gas at record concentrations and preserve it for use in chemical production.

Study Reveals ‘Radical’ Wrinkle in Forming Complex Carbon Molecules in Space

A team of scientists has discovered a new possible pathway toward forming carbon structures in space using a specialized chemical exploration technique at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source.

The Chemistry of Art: Scientists Explore Aged Paint in Microscopic Detail to Inform Preservation Efforts

To learn more about the chemical processes in oil paints that can damage aging artwork, a team led by researchers at the National Gallery of Art and the National Institute of Standards and Technology conducted a range of studies that included 3D X-ray imaging of a paint sample at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source.

Separation Anxiety No More: A Faster Technique to Purify Elements

Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new chemical separation method that is vastly more efficient than conventional processes, opening the door to faster discovery of new elements, easier nuclear fuel reprocessing, and, most tantalizing, a better way to attain actinium-225, a promising therapeutic isotope for cancer treatment.

Lithium Doesn’t Crack Under Pressure, It Transforms

Using cutting-edge theoretical calculations performed at NERSC, researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have predicted fascinating new properties of lithium – a light alkali metal that has intrigued scientists for two decades with its remarkable diversity of physical states at high pressures. “Under standard conditions, lithium is a simple metal that forms a textbook crystalline solid. However, scientists