News Center

Future Shines Bright for Space Science Intern Zachary Raha

Zachary Raha was the kind of kid who always had a side project. Today, Raha—who recently completed a Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) with Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter of the Physics Division—keeps himself busy with maps of a different scale: the expansion history of the universe as illustrated by Type Ia supernovae.

New Measurements Suggest ‘Antineutrino Anomaly’ Fueled by Modeling Error

Results from a new study involving Berkeley Lab scientists could explain a mismatch between predictions and recent measurements of ghostly particles streaming from nuclear reactors—the so-called “reactor antineutrino anomaly” that has puzzled physicists since 2011.

Hunting for Dark Matter’s ‘Hidden Valley’

Kathryn Zurek realized a decade ago that we may be searching in the wrong places for clues to one of the universe’s greatest unsolved mysteries: dark matter. Despite making up an estimated 85 percent of the total mass of the universe, we haven’t yet figured out what it’s made of.

3 Knowns and 3 Unknowns about Dark Matter

While we can’t see dark matter, we are learning more about it. Here are three knowns and three unknowns about dark matter.

2016 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics Goes to Five Neutrino Experiments, Three Made Possible by Berkeley Lab

On November 8, Silicon Valley’s ritzy, glitzy 2016 Breakthrough Prizes honored five neutrino experiments with $3 million prizes in Fundamental Physics. Three of the five, SNO, KamLAND, and Daya Bay, were made possible by Berkeley Lab scientists and engineers.

Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever

Type Ia supernovae are bright “standard candles” for measuring cosmic distances. Standard enough to discover dark energy, they’re far from identical. Researchers at the Berkeley Lab-based Nearby Supernova Factory have shown that supernova twins with closely matching spectra double the accuracy of distance measures.

2015 Nobel Prize in Physics Has Berkeley Lab Roots

Berkeley Lab scientists and engineers played important roles in the design and construction of SNO – the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory – as well as subsequent data analysis that contributed to the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to Canada’s Arthur McDonald.

DESI, an Ambitious Probe of Dark Energy, Achieves its Next Major Milestone

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced approval of Critical Decision 2 (CD–2), authorizing the scientific scope, schedule, and funding profile of DESI, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, an exceptional apparatus designed to improve our understanding of the role of dark energy in the expansion history of the universe.

Best Precision Yet for Neutrino Measurements at Daya Bay

In the Daya Bay region of China a research project is underway to study ghostlike, elusive particles called neutrinos. Today, the international Daya Bay Collaboration announces new findings on the measurements of neutrinos, paving the way forward for further neutrino research, and confirming that the Daya Bay neutrino experiment, significant as the first equal partnership between the U.S. and China in a major physics project, continues to be one to watch.

New Visitor Center in South Dakota Highlights Underground Science

The Sanford Lab Homestake Visitor Center, a facility that highlights Homestake Mine’s gold and silver past and particle physics future, held its grand opening ceremony on June 30.