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Posts Tagged ‘Molecular Foundry’

Berkeley Lab Launches Building Energy Performance Research Project at New FLEXLAB Testing Facility

April 14, 2014

The DOE’s David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, was on hand in Berkeley April 14 to tour FLEXLAB™, the Facility for Low Energy experiments in Buildings, run by Berkeley Lab’s Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Danielson and Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos also met with executives from construction firm Webcor. Webcor’s testing in FLEXLAB will allow its engineers to predict and improve the energy performance for a new building constructed for biotech company, Genentech. A building mockup for Genentech will be studied at different building orientations, specific to the actual construction site. As part of his visit to the Lab, Danielson also toured the Molecular Foundry.

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Discovery of New Semiconductor Holds Promise for 2D Physics and Electronics

March 20, 2014

Researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have discovered a unique new two-dimensional semiconductor, rhenium disulfide, that behaves electronically as if it were a 2D monolayer even as a 3D bulk material. This not only opens the door to 2D electronic applications with a 3D material, it also makes it possible to study 2D physics with easy-to-make 3D crystals.

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Bright Future for Protein Nanoprobes

March 17, 2014

Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have discovered surprising new rules for creating ultra-bright light-emitting crystals that are less than 10 nanometers in diameter. These ultra-tiny but ultra-bright nanoprobes should be a big asset for biological imaging, especially deep-tissue optical imaging of neurons in the brain.

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SOFS Take to Water

December 16, 2013

Berkeley Lab researchers have unveiled the first two-dimensional SOFs – supramolecular organic frameworks – that self-assemble in solution, an important breakthrough that holds implications for sensing and separation technologies, energy sciences, and biomimetics.

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An Inside Look at a MOF in Action

November 22, 2013

A unique inside look at the electronic structure of a highly touted metal-organic framework (MOF) as it is adsorbing carbon dioxide gas should help in the design of new and improved MOFs for carbon capture and storage.

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“Molecular Velcro” May Lead to Cost-Effective Alternatives to Natural Antibodies

October 30, 2013

Taking inspiration from the human immune system, researchers at Berkeley Lab have created a new material that can be programmed to identify an endless variety of molecules. The new material resembles tiny sheets of Velcro, each just one-hundred nanometers across. But instead of securing your sneakers, this molecular Velcro mimics the way natural antibodies recognize viruses and toxins, and could lead to a new class of biosensors.

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In Water as In Love, Likes Can Attract

September 18, 2013

Berkeley Lab researchers have shown that, contrary to the scientific axiom that only opposite charges attract, when hydrated in water, positively charged ions can pair up with one another.

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Size Matters as Nanocrystals Go Through Phases

August 26, 2013

Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have demonstrated that as metal nanocrystals go through phase transformations, size can make a much bigger difference than scientists previously believed.

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Raising the IQ of Smart Windows

August 14, 2013

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have designed a new material to make smart windows even smarter. The material is a thin coating of nanocrystals embedded in glass that can dynamically modify sunlight as it passes through a window. Unlike existing technologies, the coating provides selective control over visible light and heat-producing near-infrared (NIR) light, so windows can maximize both energy savings and occupant comfort in a wide range of climates.

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Engineering Bacterial Live Wires

February 28, 2013

Just like electronics, living cells use electrons for energy and information transfer. Despite electrons being a common “language” of the living and electronic worlds, living cells cannot speak to our largely technological realm. Giving a cell the ability to communicate directly with an electrode would lead to enormous opportunities in the development of new energy conversion techniques, fuel production, biological reporters, or new forms of bioelectronic systems. Building off previous research, a group led by Berkeley Lab’s Caroline Ajo-Franklin has now demonstrated that engineered E. coli strains can generate measurable current at an anode.

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